AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 15, Issue 7, pp 1328–1331 | Cite as

Incomplete Use of Condoms: The Importance of Sexual Arousal

  • Cynthia A. Graham
  • Richard A. Crosby
  • Robin R. Milhausen
  • Stephanie A. Sanders
  • William L. Yarber
Report

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify associations between incomplete condom use (not using condoms from start to finish of sex) and sexual arousal variables. A convenience sample of heterosexual men (n = 761) completed a web-based questionnaire. Men who scored higher on sexual arousability were more likely to put a condom on after sex had begun (AOR = 1.58). Men who reported difficulty reaching orgasm were more likely to report removing condoms before sex was over (AOR = 2.08). These findings suggest that sexual arousal may be an important, and under-studied, factor associated with incomplete use of condoms.

Keywords

Condoms Sexual pleasure Erection STI risk Men 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia A. Graham
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 8
  • Richard A. Crosby
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Robin R. Milhausen
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  • Stephanie A. Sanders
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • William L. Yarber
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Oxford Doctoral Course in Clinical PsychologyUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK
  2. 2.The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and ReproductionIndiana UniversityINUSA
  3. 3.Rural Center for AIDS/STD PreventionIndiana UniversityINUSA
  4. 4.College of Public Health at the University of KentuckyKYUSA
  5. 5.Department of Family Relations and Applied NutritionUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada
  6. 6.Department of Gender StudiesIndiana UniversityINUSA
  7. 7.Department of Applied Health ScienceIndiana UniversityINUSA
  8. 8.Oxford Doctoral Course in Clinical PsychologyIsis Education Centre, Warneford HospitalOxfordUK

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