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Preferences for Characteristics of Antiretroviral Therapy Provision in Johannesburg, South Africa: Results of a Conjoint Analysis

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Abstract

A survey was administered to HIV-infected patients and a sample in Soweto and the Johannesburg inner city to measure preferences for antiretroviral therapy (ART) provision. The 25 to 49-year-old male and female respondents viewed 20 sets of three hypothetical ART clinic choices after reading information on ART. Each set had a permutation of four levels of: monthly ART price, clinic waiting times, HIV clinic branding and clinic staff attitudes. For each set, respondents selected the preferred mix of characteristics and indicated if they would pay for it. For every ZAR 100 (USD PPP 25) increase in price, the average probability of selecting a clinic decreased by 2.8 and 3.0% in the HIV patient and household samples, respectively. Cost as well as staff attitude, wait time, and clinic branding may constitute important barriers to ART uptake and adherence in resource-poor settings.

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Acknowledgments

We thank the study participants. We are grateful to Kara Hanson for sharing a survey of hospital quality in Zambia, Frans van der Linde for data management, Drs F. Venter, D. Johnson and K. Dyar for facilitating access to HIV-infected patients and providing office space for the interviews, and Dr Angus Deaton and participants of the Third Annual AIID Workshop on the Economic Consequences of HIV/AIDS for comments. The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) under the terms of Award no. 674-A-00-05-00003-00 funded this study. The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID.

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Correspondence to Neil A. Martinson.

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Opuni, M., Bishai, D., Gray, G.E. et al. Preferences for Characteristics of Antiretroviral Therapy Provision in Johannesburg, South Africa: Results of a Conjoint Analysis. AIDS Behav 14, 807–815 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-009-9584-4

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