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Does certified organic farming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production? Reply to Muller et al

Abstract

In this comment I respond to the criticisms put forth by Muller et al. It is my assessment that the authors’ make useful suggestions for future analyses. However, their conclusion regarding the invalidity of my results are based on a misconception of the goals and data used in my article.

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Correspondence to Julius Alexander McGee.

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This comment refers to the article available at doi:10.1007/s10460-016-9706-3.

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McGee, J.A. Does certified organic farming reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural production? Reply to Muller et al. Agric Hum Values 33, 949–952 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10460-016-9702-7

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Keywords

  • Organic farming
  • Greenhouse gas emissions
  • Conventionalization