Skip to main content

Commentary on teaching food: Why I am fed up with Michael Pollan et al.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

References

  1. Allen P. (2004) Together at the Table: Sustainability and Sustenance in the American Agrifood System. University Park, Pennsylvania, The Pennsylvania State University Press

    Google Scholar 

  2. Bell M. M. (2004) Farming for Us All: Practical Agriculture and the Cultivation of Sustainability. University Park, Pennsylvania, The Pennsylvania State University

    Google Scholar 

  3. DuPuis E. M. (2001) Nature’s Perfect Food. New York, New York University Press

    Google Scholar 

  4. DuPuis E. M., Goodman D. (2005) “Should we go ‚home’ to eat? Towards a reflexive politics of localism.” Journal of Rural Studies 21(3):359–371

    Article  Google Scholar 

  5. Freidberg S. (2004) French Beans and Food Scares: Culture and Commerce in an Anxious Age. Oxford, UK, Oxford University Press

    Google Scholar 

  6. Gard M., Wright J. (2005) The Obesity Epidemic: Science, Morality, and Ideology. London, UK, Routledge

    Google Scholar 

  7. Goodall J., McEvoy G., Hudson G. (2005) Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating. New York, New York, Warner Books

    Google Scholar 

  8. Goodman D., Sorj B., Wilkinson J. (1987) From Farming to Biotechnology. Oxford, UK, Basil Blackwell

    Google Scholar 

  9. Guthman J. (2004) Agrarian Dreams? The Paradox of Organic Farming in California. Berkeley, California, University of California Press

    Google Scholar 

  10. Guthman J., DuPuis E. M. (2006) “Embodying neoliberalism: Economy, culture, and the politics of fat.” Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 24(3):427–448

    Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Hinrichs C. G. (2003) “The practice and politics of food system localization.” Journal of Rural Studies 19(1):33–45

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Joseph M. (2002) Against the Romance of Community. Minneapolis, Minnesota, University of Minnesota

    Google Scholar 

  13. Katzen M., Willet W. C. (2006) Eat, Drink, and Weigh Less: A Flexible and Delicious Way to Shrink Your Waist and Not Go Hungry. New York, New York, Hyperion

    Google Scholar 

  14. Lappé A., Terry B. (2006) Grub: Ideas for An Urban Organic Kitchen. New York, New York, Tarcher

    Google Scholar 

  15. Nestle M. (2002) Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health. Berkeley, California, University of California Press

    Google Scholar 

  16. Nestle M. (2006) What to Eat. New York, New York, North Point Press

    Google Scholar 

  17. Pollan M. (2001) The Botany of Desire. New York, New York, Random House

    Google Scholar 

  18. Pollan M. (2006) The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York, New York, Penguin

    Google Scholar 

  19. Rose N. (1999) Powers of Freedom: Reframing Political Thought. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Cambridge University Press

    Google Scholar 

  20. Schlosser E. (2001) Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the American Meal. Boston, Massachusetts, Houghton Mifflin Company

    Google Scholar 

  21. Singer P., Mason J. (2006) The Way We Eat: Why Our Food Choices Matter. Emmaus, Pennsylvania, Rodale Press

    Google Scholar 

  22. Waters, A. (2006) “Slow Food Nation.” The Nation, September 11, 2006: np

  23. Williams R. (1980) Problems in Materialism and Culture. London, UK, Verso

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Julie Guthman.

Additional information

Julie Guthman is an Assistant Professor in Community Studies at the University of California at Santa Cruz where she teaches courses in global political economy and the politics of food and agriculture. Her 2004 book, Agrarian Dreams: The Paradox of Organic Farming in California, examines how the California organic sector intersected with California’s agrarian history to replicate many aspects of industrial agriculture that it set out to oppose and, in particular, how social justice issues were shunted aside in the codification of organic agriculture. Her more recent research looks at other ways in which neo-liberalism – as both a political economic project and a form of governmentality – shapes the politics of the possible in food politics more broadly. Her new research directions involve the articulations of race, alternative food movements, and the politics of obesity.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Guthman, J. Commentary on teaching food: Why I am fed up with Michael Pollan et al.. Agric Hum Values 24, 261–264 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10460-006-9053-x

Download citation

Keywords

  • Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Food System
  • Fast Food
  • French Bean
  • Industrial Agriculture