Advertisement

Counseling Psychology Faculty’s Contributions to the Internationalization of Counseling

  • Azadeh Fatemi
  • Alan Stewart
  • Khanh Nghiem
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

In this study, we identified counseling psychology faculty members’ international publications, presentations, activities, and education abroad experiences through investigating 183 curricula vitae of faculty members in the United States. The results demonstrated that compared to four decades ago, the emphasis on international issues has increased. However, there is still a considerable number of counseling psychology faculty members who have not incorporated international issues into their professional activities. Path analysis results indicated that international presentations and activities moderately predicted internationally relevant publications. Based on these results, we proposed several ways to facilitate the internationalization of counseling psychology in the future, and discussed how internationalization could bring positive changes to the counseling psychology field.

Keywords

Internationalization Counseling psychology Faculty Research 

Notes

Author’s Contribution

All authors contributed to the development of the study and this article.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declared that they have no conflict on interest.

References

  1. Ægisdóttir, S., & Gerstein, L. H. (2010). International counseling competencies: A new frontier in multicultural training. In J. G. Ponterotto, J. M. Casas, L. A. Suzuki, & C. M. Alexander (Eds.), Handbook of multicultural counseling (pp. 175–188). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  2. American Psychological Association (2013). Accredited programs in counseling psychology. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation/programs/accred-counseling.aspx.
  3. Arnett, J. J. (2008). The neglected 95%: why American psychology needs to become less American. American Psychologist, 63, 602–614.  https://doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.63.7.602.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Chin, W. W. (2010). How to write up and report PLS analyses. In V. Esposito Vinzi, W. W. Chin, J. Henseler, & H. Wang (Eds.), Handbook of partial least squares: Concepts, methods and applications (pp. 655–690). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Efron, B., & Tibshirani, R. (1993). An introduction to the bootstrap. New York: Chapman & Hall/CRC.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Forrest, L. (2008). President’s report: reflections on the international counseling psychology conference. American Psychology Association Society of Counseling Psychology Newsletter, 29(2), 1–7.Google Scholar
  7. Fouad, N. A. (1991). Training counselors to counsel international students. The Counseling Psychologist, 19, 66–71.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000091191005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gerstein, L. H. (2006). Counseling psychologists as international social architects. In R. L. Toporek, L. H. Gerstein, N. A. Fouad, G. Roysircar-Sodowsky, & T. Israel (Eds.), Handbook for social justice in counseling psychology: Leadership, vision, and action (pp. 377–387). CA: Sage Publications.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Gerstein, L. H., & Ægisdóttir, S. (2007). Training international social change agents: transcending a U.S counseling paradigm. Counselor Education and Supervision, 47, 123–139.  https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Gerstein, L. H., Heppner, P. P., Ægisdóttir, S., Leung, S.-M. A., & Norsworthy, K. L. (2009). Cross cultural counseling: History, challenges and rationale. In L. H. Gerstein, P. P. Heppner, S. Ægisdóttir, S.-M. A. Leung, & K. L. Norsworthy (Eds.), International handbook of cross-cultural counseling: Cultural assumptions and practices worldwide (pp. 3–32). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  11. Hair, J. F., Ringle, C. M., & Sarstedt, M. (2011). PLS-SEM: indeed a silver bullet. Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice, 19, 139–151.  https://doi.org/10.2753/MTP1069-6679190202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Henrich, J., Heine, S. J., & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 61–83.  https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X0999152X.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Heppner, P. P., & Gerstein, L. H. (2008). International developments in counseling psychology. In E. Altmaier & B. D. Johnson (Eds.), Volume 1, Encyclopedia of counseling: Changes and challenges for counseling in the 21 st century (pp. 263–265). CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  14. Heppner, P. P., Leong, F. T. L., & Chiao, H. (2008). A growing internationalization of counseling psychology. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Handbook of counseling psychology (4th ed., pp. 68–85). Hoboken: Wiley.Google Scholar
  15. Heppner, P. P., Ægisdóttir, S., Leung, S.-M. A., Duan, C., Helms, J. E., Gerstein, L. H., & Pedersen, P. B. (2009). The intersection of multicultural and corss-natioal movements in the United States. In L. H. Gerstein, P. P. Heppner, S. Ægisdóttir, S.-M. A. Leung, & K. L. Norsworthy (Eds.), International handbook of cross-cultural counseling: Cultural assumptions and practices worldwide (pp. 33–52). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  16. Hwang, H., Malhotra, N. K., Kim, Y., Tomiuk, M. A., & Hong, S. (2010). A comparative study on parameter recovery of three approaches to structural equation modeling. Journal of Marketing Research, 47, 699–712.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kwan, K. K., & Gerstein, L. H. (2008). Envisioning a counseling psychology of the world: the mission of the international forum. The Counseling Psychologist, 36, 182–187.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000007313269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Leong, F. T. L., & Blustein, D. L. (2000). Toward a global vision of counseling psychology. The Counseling Psychologist, 28, 5–9.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000000281001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Leong, F. T. L., & Leach, M. M. (2007). Internationalising counseling psychology in the United States: a SWOT analysis. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 56, 165–181.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.2007.00283.x.Google Scholar
  20. Leong, F. T., & Ponterotto, J. G. (2003). A proposal for internationalizing counseling psychology in the United States: rationale, recommendations, and challenges. The Counseling Psychologist, 31, 381–395.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000003031004001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Leung, S. A. (2003). A journey worth traveling: globalization of counseling psychology. The Counseling Psychologist, 31, 412–419.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000003031004004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Leung, S. A., Clawson, T., Norsworthy, K. L., Tena, A., Szilagyi, A., & Rogers, J. (2009). Internationalization of the counseling profession: An indigenous perspective. In L. H. Gerstein, P. P. Heppner, S. Ægisdóttir, S. A. Leung, & K. L. Norsworthy (Eds.), International handbook of cross-cultural counseling (pp. 113–123). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  23. Marsella, A. J., & Pedersen, P. (2004). Internationalizing the counseling psychology curriculum: toward new values, competencies and directions. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 17, 413–423.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09515070412331331246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. McWhirter, J. J. (2000). And now, up go the walls: constructing an international room for counseling psychology. The Counseling Psychologist, 28, 117–122.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000000281007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Moodley, R. (2007). Re-placing multiculturalism in counselling and psychotherapy. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 35(1), 1–22.  https://doi.org/10.1080/03069880601106740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Norsworthy, K. L., Leung, S.-M. A., Heppner, P. P., & Wang, L. F. (2009). Crossing borders in collaboration. In L. H. Gerstein, P. P. Heppner, S. Ægisdóttir, S.-M. A. Leung, & K. L. Norsworthy (Eds.), International handbook of cross-cultural counseling: Cultural assumptions and practices worldwide (pp. 125–139). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  27. Pieterse, A., Fang, K., & Evans, S. (2011). Examining the internationalization of counseling psychology scholarship: a content analysis of two US journals. International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling, 33, 280–292.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10447-011-9134-4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Rindskopf, D. (1984). Structural equation models. Sociological Methods and Research, 13(1), 109–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Turner-Essel, L., & Waehler, C. (2009). Integrating internationalization in counseling psychology training programs. The Counseling Psychologist, 37, 877–901.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0011000009336149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Turner-Essel, L., Yakunina, E., Glover, L., & Chessar, S. (2007). Integrating internationalization, multiculturalism and social justice in counseling psychology. Poster presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention in San Francisco, California.Google Scholar
  31. Wang, L.-F., & Heppner, P. P. (2009). Cross-cultural collaboration. In L. H. Gerstein, P. P. Heppner, S. Ægisdóttir, S.-M. A. Leung, & K. L. Norsworthy (Eds.), International handbook of cross-cultural counseling: Cultural assumptions and practices worldwide (pp. 141–154). Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
  32. Wong, K. K.-K. (2013). Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) techniques using SmartPLS. Marketing Bulletin, 24, 1–32.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ball State University Counseling CenterMuncieUSA
  2. 2.The University of GeorgiaAthensUSA

Personalised recommendations