Interest in the Teaching Alliance and its Associations with Multicultural Counseling Education among a Sample of Students in the United States

Abstract

Using a scenario-based analogue experiment embedded within an online survey, 174 masters-level counseling students located at a university on the Southwest Coast of the United States provided data to test the notion that the teaching alliance—a framework for enhancing the quality of the student-instructor relationship—is (a) important in multicultural counseling course education, and (b) linked to relevant outcomes. Results offer preliminary evidence of pedagogical utility for the alliance model within a multicultural course context.

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Acknowledgments

The first author would like to thank Kiko for the daily encouragement, as well as Evelyn Gaspar, Shannon Hasson, Alyssa Hufana, Meghan Paynter and Triny Rios for their critical feedback on the manuscript. The second author would like to thank Jon and Eloise for the incredible inspiration and support throughout the career journey.

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Correspondence to Fernando Estrada.

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Estrada, F., Rigali-Oiler, M. Interest in the Teaching Alliance and its Associations with Multicultural Counseling Education among a Sample of Students in the United States. Int J Adv Counselling 38, 204–217 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10447-016-9266-7

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Keywords

  • Teaching alliance
  • Multicultural counseling education