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Counseling and Family Therapy in India: Evolving Professions in a Rapidly Developing Nation

Abstract

Outpatient counseling is a relatively new concept and form of clinical practice in India. This article provides an overview of the need for and current status of counseling and family therapy in India. Examples of training programs are presented, and future prospects for the counseling and family therapy professions are highlighted. The authors discuss therapeutic issues that clinicians may need to consider when working with Indian clients, as well as some of the potential barriers to counseling individuals, couples, and families in or from the Indian subcontinent. The future of these professions looks bright and parallels India’s rapid development as a nation.

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Correspondence to David K. Carson.

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Carson, D.K., Jain, S. & Ramirez, S. Counseling and Family Therapy in India: Evolving Professions in a Rapidly Developing Nation. Int J Adv Counselling 31, 45–56 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10447-008-9067-8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10447-008-9067-8

Keywords

  • India
  • Counseling
  • Family therapy
  • Training
  • Practice