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Psycho-Education with Asylum Seekers and Survivors of Torture

  • Peter Berliner
  • Elisabeth N. MikkelsenEmail author
Article

This article examines psycho-educational programmes for asylum-seekers and tortured refugees at the Danish Red Cross Asylum Department and Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture victims respectively. The psycho-education programme is based on a cognitive theoretical framework. However, it is argued that the processes observed during the programmes and the changes in the participants’ lives may be conjointly understood within theoretical frameworks of narrative therapy, social constructionism, and community psychology, emphasizing professionals’ and participants’ co-construction of alternative stories and action possibilities, and the importance of the context and social network outside the intervention context.

KEY WORDS:

psycho-education coping skills asylum seekers torture survivors community psychology 

Notes

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The psycho-education programme at the DRC has been developed by Psychologist Trine Lindskov and Health Visitor Kirsten Abdalla, who both have internally evaluated the programme. In addition, the programme has been evaluated internally by Mia Staehr (2001) and externally by Ask Elklit (2001). The psycho-education programme at the RCT has been developed by Psychologist Mansour Esfandari. The authors wish to thank the following for comments and inputs: Psychiatrist Ebbe Munch-Andersen, Psychologist Mia Staehr, Psychologist Trine Lindskov, Psychologist Malin Wiking, all from the Danish Red Cross, and Student Helper Lene Mogensen.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagen KDenmark
  2. 2.Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims (RCT)Copenhagen KDenmark

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