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Annals of Biomedical Engineering

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 782–792 | Cite as

Tracking of Drug Release and Material Fate for Naturally Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acid Biomaterials

  • Keith M. FaucherEmail author
  • Natalie ArtziEmail author
  • Moshe Beck
  • Rita Beckerman
  • Geoff Moodie
  • Theresa Albergo
  • Suzanne Conroy
  • Alicia Dale
  • Scott Corbeil
  • Paul Martakos
  • Elazer R. Edelman
Nondestructive Characterization of Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery

Abstract

In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted on omega-3 fatty acid-derived biomaterials to determine their utility as an implantable material for adhesion prevention following soft tissue hernia repair and as a means to allow for the local delivery of antimicrobial or antibiofilm agents. Naturally derived biomaterials offer several advantages over synthetic materials in the field of medical device development. These advantages include enhanced biocompatibility, elimination of risks posed by the presence of toxic catalysts and chemical crosslinking agents, and derivation from renewable resources. Omega-3 fatty acids are readily available from fish and plant sources and can be used to create implantable biomaterials either as a stand-alone device or as a device coating that can be utilized in local drug delivery applications. In-depth characterization of material erosion degradation over time using non-destructive imaging and chemical characterization techniques provided mechanistic insight into material structure: function relationship. This in turn guided rational tailoring of the material based on varying fatty acid composition to control material residence time and hence drug release. These studies demonstrate the utility of omega-3 fatty acid derived biomaterials as an absorbable material for soft tissue hernia repair and drug delivery applications.

Keywords

Fish oil Omega-3 fatty acids In vivo material tracking IVIS Fluorescence Biomaterials 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Irina Kozlova and Anthony Horner for technical support during these studies. ERE was funded in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01 GM 49039).

Disclosures

This work was performed using a gifted grant provided by Atrium Medical Corporation.

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Copyright information

© Biomedical Engineering Society 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith M. Faucher
    • 1
    Email author
  • Natalie Artzi
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Moshe Beck
    • 2
    • 4
  • Rita Beckerman
    • 2
    • 4
  • Geoff Moodie
    • 1
  • Theresa Albergo
    • 1
  • Suzanne Conroy
    • 1
  • Alicia Dale
    • 1
  • Scott Corbeil
    • 1
  • Paul Martakos
    • 1
  • Elazer R. Edelman
    • 2
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Research and DevelopmentMAQUET Vascular Systems (formally Atrium Medical Corporation)MerrimackUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Medical Engineering and ScienceMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical SchoolBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA
  4. 4.ORT Braude CollegeKarmielIsrael
  5. 5.Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical SchoolBrigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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