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The acute physiological effects of high- and low-velocity resistance exercise in older adults

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine if workload matched, high-velocity (HVE) and low-velocity (LVE) resistance exercise protocols, elicit differing acute physiological responses in older adults. Ten older adults completed three sets of eight exercises on six separate occasions (three HVE and three LVE sessions). Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and blood lactate were measured pre- and post-exercise, heart rate was measured before exercise and following each set of each exercise. Finally, a rating of perceived exertion was measured following each set of each exercise. There were no significant differences in blood lactate (F(1,9) = 0.028; P = 0.872; \(\eta_{\text{P}}^{ 2}\) = 0.003), heart rate (F(1,9) = 0.045; P = 0.837; \(\eta_{\text{P}}^{ 2}\) = 0.005), systolic blood pressure (F(1,9) = 0.023; P = 0.884; \(\eta_{\text{P}}^{ 2}\) = 0.003) or diastolic blood pressure (F(1,9) = 1.516; P = 0.249; \(\eta_{\text{P}}^{ 2}\) = 0.144) between HVE and LVE. However, LVE elicited significantly greater ratings of perceived exertion compared to HVE (F(1,9) = 13.059; P = 0.006; \(\eta_{\text{P}}^{ 2}\) = 0.592). The present workload matched HVE and LVE protocols produced comparable physiological responses, although greater exertion was perceived during LVE.

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Correspondence to Darren L. Richardson.

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Richardson, D.L., Duncan, M.J., Jimenez, A. et al. The acute physiological effects of high- and low-velocity resistance exercise in older adults. Eur J Ageing 15, 311–319 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10433-017-0439-y

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