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Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in Wild Bonobos

  • Kim S. Grützmacher
  • Verena Keil
  • Sonja Metzger
  • Livia Wittiger
  • Ilka Herbinger
  • Sebastien Calvignac-Spencer
  • Kerstin Mätz-Rensing
  • Olivia Haggis
  • Laurent Savary
  • Sophie Köndgen
  • Fabian H. Leendertz
Short Communication

Abstract

Despite being important conservation tools, tourism and research may cause transmission of pathogens to wild great apes. Investigating respiratory disease outbreaks in wild bonobos, we identified human respiratory syncytial virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae as causative agents. A One Health approach to disease control should become part of great ape programs.

Keywords

Human respiratory syncytial virus Streptococcus pneumoniae Wild bonobo DRC Zoonoses 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank our collaborator, the local NGO Mbou-Mon-Tour for their support and the chiefs and communities of Nkala, Nko and Mpelu for giving access to their forests, and the trackers and the health monitor, Mame Ngono Tonton, for their hard work. We would like to thank Charles-Albert Petre, the Scientific Coordinator for the project for help with sample collection and the student, Maeva Vinot and the volunteers Kelly Mannion and Emmanuel Mahe who were present during the 2015 outbreak and helped to monitor the sick bonobos. Our thanks also go to the funders of the bonobo project, WWF Belgium and WWF Netherlands and to WWF Germany for providing the project with health monitoring equipment. We are also grateful for the support of the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN) and the Ministry of Environment, Conservation, Nature and Sustainable Development (MECNEDD). We finally thank Philipp Goeltenboth and Bruno Perodeau for organizational and logistical support and the Hans Böckler Stiftung, the ARCUS great ape fund, the EAZA Ape Conservation Fund and Zoo Leipzig for support and funding.

Supplementary material

10393_2018_1319_MOESM1_ESM.docx (4.9 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 4995 kb)

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Copyright information

© EcoHealth Alliance 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kim S. Grützmacher
    • 1
  • Verena Keil
    • 1
  • Sonja Metzger
    • 2
  • Livia Wittiger
    • 2
  • Ilka Herbinger
    • 2
  • Sebastien Calvignac-Spencer
    • 1
  • Kerstin Mätz-Rensing
    • 3
  • Olivia Haggis
    • 4
  • Laurent Savary
    • 4
  • Sophie Köndgen
    • 1
  • Fabian H. Leendertz
    • 1
  1. 1.Epidemiology of Highly Pathogenic MicroorganismsRobert Koch-InstituteBerlinGermany
  2. 2.World Wide Fund for NatureBerlinGermany
  3. 3.German Primate CentreGöttingenGermany
  4. 4.World Wide Fund for NatureKinshasaDemocratic Republic of the Congo

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