EcoHealth

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 404–407 | Cite as

Moving Beyond Too Little, Too Late: Managing Emerging Infectious Diseases in Wild Populations Requires International Policy and Partnerships

  • Jamie Voyles
  • A. Marm Kilpatrick
  • James P. Collins
  • Matthew C. Fisher
  • Winifred F. Frick
  • Hamish McCallum
  • Craig K. R. Willis
  • David S. Blehert
  • Kris A. Murray
  • Robert Puschendorf
  • Erica Bree Rosenblum
  • Benjamin M. Bolker
  • Tina L. Cheng
  • Kate E. Langwig
  • Daniel L. Lindner
  • Mary Toothman
  • Mark Q. Wilber
  • Cheryl J. Briggs
Forum

References

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  19. World Health Organization. International Health Regulations (2005) http://www.who.int/ihr/en/. Accessed 10 March 2014
  20. World Organization for Animal Health. Aquatic Animal Health Code (2008) http://www.oie.int/doc/ged/D6442.PDF. Accessed 10 March 2014.

Copyright information

© International Association for Ecology and Health 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jamie Voyles
    • 1
  • A. Marm Kilpatrick
    • 2
  • James P. Collins
    • 3
  • Matthew C. Fisher
    • 4
  • Winifred F. Frick
    • 2
  • Hamish McCallum
    • 5
  • Craig K. R. Willis
    • 6
  • David S. Blehert
    • 7
  • Kris A. Murray
    • 8
  • Robert Puschendorf
    • 9
  • Erica Bree Rosenblum
    • 10
  • Benjamin M. Bolker
    • 11
  • Tina L. Cheng
    • 2
  • Kate E. Langwig
    • 2
  • Daniel L. Lindner
    • 12
  • Mary Toothman
    • 13
  • Mark Q. Wilber
    • 13
  • Cheryl J. Briggs
    • 13
  1. 1.Department of BiologyNew Mexico TechSocorroUSA
  2. 2.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of California, Santa CruzSanta CruzUSA
  3. 3.School of Life Sciences Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  4. 4.Department of Infectious Disease EpidemiologyImperial College of LondonLondonUK
  5. 5.School of EnvironmentGriffith UniversityNathanAustralia
  6. 6.Department of BiologyUniversity of WinnipegWinnipegCanada
  7. 7.United States Geological Survey, National Wildlife Health CenterMadisonUSA
  8. 8.EcoHealth Alliance, New YorkNew YorkUSA
  9. 9.School of Biological SciencesPlymouth UniversityPlymouthUK
  10. 10.Department of Environmental Science, Policy and ManagementUniversity of California, BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA
  11. 11.Departments of Mathematics & Statistics and BiologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  12. 12.United States Forest Service, Center for Mycology ResearchMadisonUSA
  13. 13.Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine BiologyUniversity of California, Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA

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