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Practical treatment options for persistent central serous chorioretinopathy and early visual and anatomical outcomes

  • Clinical Investigation
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Abstract

Purpose

Persistent central serous chorioretinopathy (pCSC) may be treated by laser photocoagulation (PC), selective retina therapy (SRT), or photodynamic therapy (PDT). We conducted retrospective analyses regarding the choice of therapy for pCSC in the best clinical practice and the outcomes of these modalities.

Study design

A retrospective interventional study.

Methods

The records of 71 eyes of 68 treatment naïve pCSC cases who underwent PC, SRT, or PDT were reviewed. First, the baseline clinical parameters were evaluated to find significant factors associated with the choice of treatment option. Second, the 3 months’ visual and anatomical outcomes of each modality were assessed.

Results

The PC, SRT, and PDT groups included 7, 22, and 42 eyes, respectively. The leakage pattern in fluorescein angiography (FA) was significantly associated with the choice of treatment (p<0.005). The dry macula ratio at 3 months post-treatment was 29%, 59%, and 81% in the PC, SRT, and PDT groups, respectively, which significantly differed among the groups (p<0.01). The best-corrected visual acuities tended to be improved after the treatments in all groups. Central choroidal thickness (CCT) was significantly decreased in all groups (p<0.05, p<0.01, and p<0.00001, in PC, SRT, and PDT groups, respectively). Logistic regression analysis for dry macula revealed that SRT (p<0.05), PDT (p<0.05), and the changes in CCT (p<0.01)were the significant association factors.

Conclusion

The leakage pattern in FA was associated with the choice of treatment option for pCSC. PDT achieved a significantly higher dry macula ratio than PC, 3 months after the treatment.

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Data availability

The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported in part by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT)—No. 19 K09997. The funding organizations had no role in the design or conduct of this research.

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Correspondence to Shigeru Honda.

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N. Yamada-Okahara, None; A. Kyo, None; K. Hirayama, None; M. Yamamoto, None; T. Kohno, None; S. Honda, Payment or honoraria for lectures, presentations, speakers bureaus, manuscript writing or educational events (Novartis, Santen, Senju).

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Corresponding Author: Shigeru Honda

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Yamada-Okahara, N., Kyo, A., Hirayama, K. et al. Practical treatment options for persistent central serous chorioretinopathy and early visual and anatomical outcomes. Jpn J Ophthalmol 67, 295–300 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10384-023-00978-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10384-023-00978-9

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