Controlling role of Ta-d pumice on the coseismic landslides triggered by 2018 Hokkaido Eastern Iburi Earthquake

Abstract

The 2018 Hokkaido Eastern Iburi Earthquake triggered massive landslides in the pyroclastic fall deposits. Most of them are shallow debris slides. Based on the field reconnaissance, the shallow debris slides were further categorized into three types: steep translational sliding, gentle translational sliding, and mobilization of V-shaped convergent sliding masses. The three types of shallow landslides were investigated in depth through longitudinal sections, vertical stratigraphic sections, and in situ hardness tests. All three types of shallow landslides were found to initiate from the liquefied failure of the weak Ta-d pumice layer and further evolve to the overall mobilization of the superimposed pyroclastic fall deposits along the liquefied sliding zone. To testify the controlling role and to study the shear behavior as well as the anti-liquefaction strength of the weak Ta-d pumice layer, a series of laboratory tests (basic physical tests and triaxial tests) were conducted on the soils around the sliding zone. The test results indicate that the medium sandy Ta-d pumice MS and the fragile Ta-d pumice CS have lower shear resistance and anti-liquefaction strength than other layers and they can be easily liquefied under intense ground motion. One paleosol layer underlying the Ta-d pumice shows low permeability and enables weathering and soil erosion of the Ta-d pumice, resulting in the widespread existence of the fragile and medium sandy pumice layers in Ta-d. In addition, the positive relationship between coseismic landslide density and Ta-d pumice thickness demonstrates the controlling role of the Ta-d on Iburi landslide occurrence from a macro perspective.

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Acknowledgments

The authors want to thank Tetsuya INUI for providing useful information in the field investigation and visit to the local geological museum. The authors express their sincere gratitude to Prof. Jingshan Bo, Prof. Ping Li, Dr. Xiaobo Li (Institute of Disaster Prevention, China), Dr. Feng Ji (Chengdu University of Technology, China), Dr. Zili Dai, Prakash Dhungana, Kounghoon Nam, and Akinori Iio (Shimane University, Matsue, Japan) for their kind assistance in the field work. We gratefully acknowledge the support provided by the local government and the local museum. We sincerely appreciate the valuable comments and suggestions from the editor and reviewers which considerably improves this work. Ran Li also acknowledged China Scholarship Council (CSC) for financially supporting the study in Shimane University, Japan.

Funding

This study was financially supported by the fund “Initiation and motion mechanisms of long runout landslides due to rainfall and earthquake in the falling pyroclastic deposit slope area” (JSPS-B-19H01980, Principal Investigator: Fawu Wang) and Fundamental Research Grant (2017–2019) of Shimane University on “Development of prediction and mitigation technologies on natural disasters in subduction zone using San-in region as a research field.”

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Correspondence to Fawu Wang.

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Li, R., Wang, F. & Zhang, S. Controlling role of Ta-d pumice on the coseismic landslides triggered by 2018 Hokkaido Eastern Iburi Earthquake. Landslides 17, 1233–1250 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-020-01349-y

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Keywords

  • Iburi earthquake
  • Ta-d pumice
  • Shallow debris slide
  • Triaxial tests
  • Sliding zone liquefaction