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Reply to discussion on “Guidelines on the use of inverse velocity method as a tool for setting alarm thresholds and forecasting landslides and structure collapses” by F. Bozzano, P. Mazzanti, and S. Moretto

The Original Article was published on 28 March 2018

Abstract

■■■The paper “Discussion to: Guidelines on the use of inverse velocity method as a tool for setting alarm thresholds and forecasting landslides and structure collapses by T. Carlà, E. Intrieri, F. Di Traglia, T. Nolesini, G. Gigli and N. Casagli” by Bozzano et al. brings forward new considerations on an issue of extreme concern in landslide risk management. To this day, the ability to predict catastrophic landslide failures from slope surface displacements is a problem dictated more by practical constraints rather than by theoretical uncertainties. In this sense, the development of data interpretation practices is crucial. This short reply provides a few further insights with regard to this subject, also in the context of the recently published literature.

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Correspondence to Tommaso Carlà.

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Carlà, T., Intrieri, E., Di Traglia, F. et al. Reply to discussion on “Guidelines on the use of inverse velocity method as a tool for setting alarm thresholds and forecasting landslides and structure collapses” by F. Bozzano, P. Mazzanti, and S. Moretto. Landslides 15, 1443–1444 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-018-0991-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10346-018-0991-3

Keywords

  • Landslide failure forecasting
  • Inverse velocity method