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Landslides

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 161–173 | Cite as

Effect assessment of debris flow mitigation works based on numerical simulation by using Kanako 2D

  • Jinfeng LiuEmail author
  • Kana Nakatani
  • Takahisa Mizuyama
Original Paper

Abstract

Mitigation works are very essential for mitigation of debris-flow hazards in mountainous areas. Usually, it is difficult to assess the effectiveness of existing mitigation works in a catchment. This paper presented a method for quantitative assessment of debris flow mitigation measures by using Kanako system, a user-friendly GUI-equipped debris flow simulator that allows good visualization and easy interpretation. Kanako 2D (Ver. 2.04) was applied to a case study at Caijia Gully, Sichuan Province, China. Mitigation works including check dams, drainage channel, and deposition basin were constructed in the gully in 2001 and 2006. Kanako 2D can simulate debris flow from steep area to alluvial fan. 1D simulation was applied for assessing the effect of the check dams at the lower part of the gully, and 2D simulation was applied for the effect of the drainage channel and deposition basin on the alluvial fan. The simulation results indicate that debris flow will cause great damage to residential area on the alluvial fan if mitigation measures were not implemented in the gully. For old dams which have been filled up with deposits of previous debris flows, the results show that they still have the function for controlling debris flow due to the gradient reduction of the channel bed in front of the dams by the trapped debris flow deposition. After the comprehensive control of debris flow including trapping, drainage, and deposition in the gully, the simulation results indicate that the risk on the alluvial fan can be reduced to an acceptable level.

Keywords

Effect assessment Debris flow Mitigation measures Numerical simulation Kanako 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This research was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (40901008) and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2011CB409903).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Mountain Surface Process and Hazards/Institute of Mountain Hazards and EnvironmentChinese Academy of SciencesChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Erosion Control EngineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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