European Journal of Wildlife Research

, Volume 61, Issue 4, pp 635–639 | Cite as

Diverse gammacoronaviruses detected in wild birds from Madagascar

  • Francisco Esmaile de Sales Lima
  • Patricia Gil
  • Miguel Pedrono
  • Cécile Minet
  • Olivier Kwiatek
  • Fabrício Souza Campos
  • Fernando Rosado Spilki
  • Paulo Michel Roehe
  • Ana Cláudia Franco
  • Olivier Fridolin Maminiaina
  • Emmanuel Albina
  • Renata Servan de Almeida
Short Communication

Abstract

To date, infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is potentially found in wild birds of different species. This work reports the survey of coronaviruses in wild birds from Madagascar based on the targeting of a conserved genome sequence among different groups of CoVs. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the presence of gammacoronaviruses in different species of Gruiformes, Passeriformes, Ciconiiformes, Anseriformes, and Charadriiformes. Furthermore, some sequences were related to various IBV strains. Aquatic and migratory birds may play an important role in the maintenance and spread of coronaviruses in nature, highlighting their possible contribution in the emergence of new coronavirus diseases in wild and domestic birds.

Keywords

Gammacoronavirus Wild birds Madagascar 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francisco Esmaile de Sales Lima
    • 1
  • Patricia Gil
    • 2
    • 3
  • Miguel Pedrono
    • 4
    • 5
  • Cécile Minet
    • 2
    • 3
  • Olivier Kwiatek
    • 2
    • 3
  • Fabrício Souza Campos
    • 1
  • Fernando Rosado Spilki
    • 1
  • Paulo Michel Roehe
    • 1
  • Ana Cláudia Franco
    • 1
  • Olivier Fridolin Maminiaina
    • 4
  • Emmanuel Albina
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • Renata Servan de Almeida
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Virology Laboratory, Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology Department, Institute of Basic Health SciencesFederal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)Porto AlegreBrazil
  2. 2.CIRAD, UMR CMAEEMontpellierFrance
  3. 3.INRA, UMR1309 CMAEEMontpellierFrance
  4. 4.FOFIFA-DRZVAntananarivoMadagascar
  5. 5.CIRAD, UR AGIRSMontpellierFrance
  6. 6.CIRAD, UMR CMAEEPetit-BourgFrance

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