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Correction to: The olfactive responses of Tetranychus urticae natural enemies in citrus depend on plant genotype, prey presence, and their diet specialization

The Original Article was published on 27 March 2019

Correction to: Journal of Pest Science (2019) 92:1165–1177 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10340-019–01107-7

In the original publication of the article, the authors have inadvertently presented Figs.1-4 that were prepared from an incorrect data-set and were therefore inaccurate. The corrected figures and related statistical results are published herein. In addition, data supporting the corrected figures are provided as new supplementary online material (Supplementary Table 2 and Supplementary Figs. 3-6).

The ecological relevance of certain responses to particular treatments were still discussed when P-values neared 0.05 (Wasserstein et al. 2019). This was the case of the preferences of Tetranychus urticae for (a) conspecific infested plants, where Cleopatra mandarin was preferred to sour orange (P ≤ 0.058), and (b) when having to choose between clean and infested Cleopatra mandarin, where infested plants were mostly preferred (P = 0.058) (Fig. 1; Supplementary Fig. 3). Similarly, the preferences of Euseius stipulatus and Neoseiulus californicus for T. urticae body odors were associated with a P-value of 0.058 (Figs. 2 and 3; Supplementary Figs. 4, 5). Finally, when having to choose between the same plant genotype, either infested or not, a P = 0.058 was obtained for N. californicus and sour orange (Fig. 3; Supplementary Fig. 5) and for Phytoseiulus persimilis and both sour orange and Cleopatra mandarin (Fig. 4; Supplementary Fig. 6). As a consequence, the conclusions discussed in the paper remain valid.

Fig. 1
figure1

Olfactory responses of Tetranychus urticae adult females to conspecific mites. Six different combinations, in which T. urticae had to choose between two odor sources, were tested. Four replicates of 10 responding adult females per choice combination were tested (see supplementary online material). These females were subjected to a starvation period of 24 h prior to the onset of the assay. From top to bottom these combinations were: empty glass versus T. urticae, Cleopatra mandarin uninfested plants (Cleo) versus sour orange uninfested plants (SO), SO versus SO-infested plants (SO Inf), Cleo versus Cleo-infested plants (Cleo Inf), SO inf versus Cleo inf. Plants, and Cleo versus Cleo induced (Cleo Ind). Infested plants had been exposed to 25 T. urticae adult females for 48 h before the onset of the assay. Induced plants had been exposed to T. urticae-infested sour orange plants for 72 h. Results of each olfactometer test were initially subjected to logistic regression to check for the effect of replicate on mite preference. Lack of significance (P > 0.05) (see supplementary online material) was a prerequisite to pool the four replicates, which were then subjected to chi-squared analysis to test whether they departed from a 1:1 distribution

Fig. 2
figure2

Olfactory responses of Euseius stipulatus adult females to T. urticae. Six different combinations, in which E. stipulatus had to choose between two odor sources, were tested. Four replicates of 10 responding adult females per choice combination were tested (see supplementary online material). These females were subjected to a starvation period of 24 h prior to the onset of the assay. From top to bottom these combinations were: empty glass versus T. urticae, Cleopatra mandarin uninfested plants (Cleo) versus sour orange uninfested plants (SO), SO versus SO-infested plants (SO Inf), Cleo versus Cleo-infested plants (Cleo Inf), SO inf versus Cleo inf. Plants, and Cleo versus Cleo induced (Cleo Ind). Infested plants had been exposed to 25 T. urticae adult females for 48 h before the onset of the assay. Induced plants had been exposed to T. urticae-infested sour orange plants for 72 h. Results of each olfactometer test were initially subjected to logistic regression to check for the effect of replicate on mite preference. Lack of significance (P > 0.05) (see supplementary online material) was a prerequisite to pool the four replicates, which were then subjected to chi-squared analysis to test whether they departed from a 1:1 distribution

Fig. 3
figure3

Olfactory responses of Neoseiulus californicus adult females to T. urticae. Six different combinations, in which N. californicus had to choose between two odor sources, were tested. Four replicates of 10 responding adult females per choice combination were tested (see supplementary online material). These females were subjected to a starvation period of 24 h prior to the onset of the assay. From top to bottom these combinations were: empty glass versus T. urticae, Cleopatra mandarin uninfested plants (Cleo) versus sour orange uninfested plants (SO), SO versus SO-infested plants (SO Inf), Cleo versus Cleo-infested plants (Cleo Inf), SO inf versus Cleo inf. Plants, and Cleo versus Cleo induced (Cleo Ind). Infested plants had been exposed to 25 T. urticae adult females for 48 h before the onset of the assay. Induced plants had been exposed to T. urticae-infested sour orange plants for 72 h. Results of each olfactometer test were initially subjected to logistic regression to check for the effect of replicate on mite preference. Lack of significance (P > 0.05) (see supplementary online material) was a prerequisite to pool the four replicates, which were then subjected to chi-squared analysis to test whether they departed from a 1:1 distribution

Fig. 4
figure4

Olfactory responses of Phytoseiulus persimilis adult females to T. urticae. Six different combinations, in which P. persimilis had to choose between two odor sources, were tested. Four replicates of 10 responding adult females per choice combination were tested (see supplementary online material). These females were subjected to a starvation period of 24 h prior to the onset of the assay. From top to bottom these combinations were: empty glass versus T. urticae, Cleopatra mandarin uninfested plants (Cleo) versus sour orange uninfested plants (SO), SO versus SO-infested plants (SO Inf), Cleo versus Cleo-infested plants (Cleo Inf), SO inf versus Cleo inf. Plants, and Cleo versus Cleo induced (Cleo Ind). Infested plants had been exposed to 25 T. urticae adult females for 48 h before the onset of the assay. Induced plants had been exposed to T. urticae-infested sour orange plants for 72 h. Results of each olfactometer test were initially subjected to logistic regression to check for the effect of replicate on mite preference. Lack of significance (P > 0.05) (see supplementary online material) was a prerequisite to pool the four replicates, which were then subjected to chi-squared analysis to test whether they departed from a 1:1 distribution

References

  1. Wasserstein RL, Schirm AL, Lazar NA (2019) Moving to a World Beyond “p < 0.05”, Am Stat 73 (sup1): 1–19. https://doi.org/10.1080/00031305.2019.1583913

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Correspondence to Josep A. Jaques.

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Cabedo‑López, M., Cruz‑Miralles, J., Vacas, S. et al. Correction to: The olfactive responses of Tetranychus urticae natural enemies in citrus depend on plant genotype, prey presence, and their diet specialization. J Pest Sci 94, 1049–1052 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10340-021-01364-5

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