Simultaneous reduction in incidence of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Sylepta derogata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) using velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti as a trap crop

Abstract

Trap cropping is a useful tool in sustainable pest management. Trap crops usually target a single species or genus of insect pests. In this study, we assessed the potential of velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) as a trap crop for two distant insect species, Bemisia tabaci and Sylepta derogata in Chinese cotton fields from 2006 to 2009. Under laboratory conditions, velvetleaf, a known trap plant of B. tabaci, was preferred over cotton by S. derogata for oviposition, and the subsequent offspring had greater survival and faster development on velvetleaf than cotton. Field-plot trials showed that population densities of S. derogata were 46–110 times greater on velvetleaf than on cotton, respectively. Commercial field trials indicated that S. derogata density and leaf damage were 79–90 % and 83–94 % lower in cotton fields inter-planted with sprayed velvetleaf strips than without them, respectively; whereas densities of B. tabaci were 21–51 % lower in fields with sprayed velvetleaf strips than in those without. At >10 m from velvetleaf strips, densities of B. tabaci and S. derogata in cotton gradually increased. Velvetleaf strips were an effective trap crop for simultaneous management of B. tabaci and S. derogata in cotton fields.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4

References

  1. Barari H, Cook SM, Clark SJ, Williams IH (2005) Effect of a turnip rape (Brassica rapa) trap crop on stem-mining pests and their parasitiods in oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Biocontrol 50:69–86

    Article  Google Scholar 

  2. Castle SJ (2006) Concentration and management of Bemisia tabaci in cantaloupe as a trap crop for cotton. Crop Prot 25:574–584

    Article  Google Scholar 

  3. Chen D (2000) Study on using velvetleaf to control Helicoverpa armigera. Plant Prot Technol Ext 20:44

    CAS  Google Scholar 

  4. Cheo MT, Yang QH, Xie YQ, Xie YS (1986) Studies on the integrated control of cotton insects in north China. Acta Phytophyl Sin 13:251–258

    Google Scholar 

  5. Cook SM, Watts NP, Hunter F, Smart LE, Williams IH (2004) Effects of a turnip rape trap crop on the spatial distribution of Meligethes aeneus and Ceutorhynchus assimilis in oilseed rape. IOBC/wprs Bull 27:199–206

    Google Scholar 

  6. Cook SM, Smart LE, Martin JL, Murray DA, Watts NP, Williams IH (2006) Exploitation of host plant preferences in pest management strategies for oilseed rape (Brassica napus). Entomol Exp Appl 119:221–229

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Cook SM, Khan ZR, Pickett JA (2007) The use of push–pull strategies in integrated pest management. Annu Rev Entomol 25:375–400

    Article  Google Scholar 

  8. De Jong PW, De Vos H, Nielsen JK (2001) Demic structure and its relation with the distribution of an adaptive trait in Danish flea beetles. Mol Ecol 10:1323–1332

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  9. Ellsworth PC, Martinez-Carrillo JL (2001) IPM for Bemisia tabaci: a case study from North America. Crop Prot 20:853–869

    Article  Google Scholar 

  10. Ferreira SA, Pitz KY, Manshardt R, Zee F, Fitch MM, Gonsalves D (2002) Virus coat protein transgenic papaya provides practical control of papaya ringspot virus in Hawaii. Plant Dis 86:101–105

    Article  Google Scholar 

  11. Godfrey LD, Leigh TF (1994) Alfalfa harvest strategy effect on Lygus bug (Hemiptera: Miridae) and insect predator population density: implications for use as trap crop in cotton. Environ Entomol 23:1106–1118

    Article  Google Scholar 

  12. Hokkanen HMT (1991) Trap cropping in pest management. Annu Rev Entomol 36:119–138

    Article  Google Scholar 

  13. Holden MH, Ellner SP, Lee D, Nyrop JP, Sanderson JP (2012) Designing an effective trap cropping strategy: the effects of attraction, retention and plant spatial distribution. J Appl Ecol 49:715–722

    Google Scholar 

  14. Khan ZR, Midega CAO, Amudavi DM, Njuguna EM, Wanyama JW, Pickett JA (2008) Economic performance of the ‘push–pull’ technology for stemborer and striga control in smallholder farming systems in western Kenya. Crop Prot 27:1084–1097

    Article  Google Scholar 

  15. Khan ZR, Midega CAO, Wanyama JM, Amudavi DM, Hassanali A, Pittchar J, Pickett JA (2009) Integration of edible beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) into the push–pull technology developed for stemborer and striga control in maize-based cropping systems. Crop Prot 28:997–1006

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Lin KJ, Wu KM, Zhang YJ, Guo YY (2006) Evaluation of piemarker Abutilon theophrasti Medic as a trap plant in the integrated management of Bemisia tabaci (biotype B) in cotton and soybean crops. Sci Agric Sin 39:1379–1386

    Google Scholar 

  17. Lin KJ, Wu KM, Zhang YJ, Guo YY (2008) The feeding and oviposition behaviors of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B on five host plants. Acta Phytophyl Sin 35:199–204

    Google Scholar 

  18. Liu F, Yang YZ, Lu YH, Kang XX, Yu YS, Chen J, Wu JY, Wan NF (2005) Effects of the transgenic Bt cotton on population dynamics of the cotton leaf-roller Sylepta derogata. China Bull Entomol 42:275–277

    Google Scholar 

  19. Lu JH, Liu SS, Shelton AM (2004) Laboratory evaluations of a wild crucifer Barbarea vulgaris as a management tool for the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae). Bull Entomol Res 94:509–516

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  20. Lu YH, Wu KM, Wyckhuys KAG, Guo YY (2009) Potential of mungbean, Vigna radiatus as a trap crop for managing Apolygus lucorum (Hemiptera: Miridae) on Bt cotton. Crop Prot 28:77–81

    Article  Google Scholar 

  21. Mainali BP, Lim UL (2008) Evaluation of chrysanthemum flower model trap to attract two Frankliniella thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). J Asia-Pac Entomol 11:171–174

    Article  Google Scholar 

  22. Mensah RK, Khan M (1997) Use of Medicago sativa (L.) interplantings/trap crops in the management of the green mirid, Creontiades dilutus (Stål) in commercial cotton in Australia. Int J Pest Manag 43:197–202

    Article  Google Scholar 

  23. Michaud JP, Qureshi JA, Grant AK (2007) Sunflowers as a trap crop for reducing soybean losses to the stalk borer Dectes texanus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Pest Manag Sci 63:903–909

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  24. Moreau TL, Isman MB (2012) Combining reduced-risk products, trap crops and yellow sticky traps for greenhouse whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) management on sweet peppers (Capsicum annum). Crop Prot 34:42–46

    Article  CAS  Google Scholar 

  25. Naranjo S (2001) Conservation and evaluation of natural enemies in IPM systems for Bemisia tabaci. Crop Prot 20:835–852

    Article  Google Scholar 

  26. Oliveira MR, Henneberry TJ, Anderson P (2001) History, current status, and collaborative research projects for Bemisia tabaci. Crop Prot 20:709–723

    Article  Google Scholar 

  27. Pair SD (1997) Evaluation of systemically treated squash trap plants and attracticidal baits for early-season control of striped and spotted cucumber beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and squash bug (Hemiptera: Coreidae) in cucurbit crops. J Econ Entomol 90:1307–1314

    Article  Google Scholar 

  28. Potting RPJ, Perry JN, Powell W (2005) Insect behavioural ecology and other factors affecting the control efficacy of agro-ecosystem diversification strategies. Ecol Model 182:199–216

    Article  Google Scholar 

  29. Ren H, Yang XH (2009) The application of velvetleaf in the forecasting of Helicoverpa armigera. China Cotton 36:31

    Google Scholar 

  30. Ren SX, Wang ZZ, Qiu BL, Xiao Y (2001) The pest status of Bemisia tabaci in China and non-chemical control strategies. Acta Entomol Sin 8:279–288

    Google Scholar 

  31. Shelton AM, Badenes-Perez FR (2006) Concepts and applications of trap cropping in pest management. Annu Rev Entomol 51:285–308

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  32. Stern VM, van den Bosch R, Leigh TF (1964) Strip cutting alfalfa for lygus bug control. Calif Agric 18:4–6

    Google Scholar 

  33. Stern VM, Mueller A, Sevacherian V, Way M (1969) Lygus bug control in cotton through alfalfa interplanting. Calif Agric 23:8–10

    Google Scholar 

  34. Tillman PG, Cottrell TE (2012) Case study: trap crop with pheromone traps for suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in cotton. Psyche. doi:10.1155/2012/401703

  35. Tscharntke T, Brandl R (2004) Plant–insect interactions in fragmented landscapes. Annu Rev Entomol 49:405–430

    Article  CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  36. Uwayis A, Li HB, Ma Q, Yao J, Yi J, Li XY, Sun SL (2005) Selection for trap plants of Helicoverpa armigera. Plant Prot 31:77–80

    Google Scholar 

  37. Wu JH, Huang Z, Ren SX, Zhou HP (2008) Control of different insecticides in field on Sylepta derogata population. J South China Agric Univ 29:21–24

    Google Scholar 

  38. Yuan LZ, Wang SL, Zhou JC, Du YZ, Zhang YJ, Wang JJ (2012) Status of insecticide resistance and associated mutations in Q-biotype of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, from eastern China. Crop Prot 31:67–71

    Article  Google Scholar 

  39. Zhou ZM, Li JY, Li ZL, Chen YZ (1975) Primary studies on Sylepta derogata Fab. Acta Entomol Sin 18:404–410

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

Thanks for Dr. Bing Liu for assistance in data analysis, and two anonymous reviewers for valuable comments on earlier version of this manuscript. This research was supported by financial assistance from the National Nature Science Foundation of China (30800131, 31321004) and the Special Fund for Agro-scientific Research in the Public Interest (201303019).

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Yanhui Lu.

Additional information

Communicated by M. Jonsson.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Lin, K., Lu, Y., Wan, P. et al. Simultaneous reduction in incidence of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Sylepta derogata (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) using velvetleaf, Abutilon theophrasti as a trap crop. J Pest Sci 88, 49–56 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10340-014-0584-4

Download citation

Keywords

  • Bemisia tabaci
  • Sylepta derogata
  • Velvetleaf
  • Cotton
  • Multi-pest trap cropping