Journal of Pest Science

, Volume 86, Issue 2, pp 211–216 | Cite as

Initial and residual efficacy of insecticides on different surfaces against rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (L.)

  • Dušan Jankov
  • Dušanka Inđić
  • Petar Kljajić
  • Radmila Almaši
  • Goran Andrić
  • Slavica Vuković
  • Mila Grahovac
Original Paper

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate how various types of storage facilities with, e.g., concrete, metal, and plywood surfaces interfere with the activity of different insecticide formulations used for rice weevil Sitophilus oryzae (L.) control: malathion (EC), pirimiphos-methyl (EC), and lambda-cyhalothrin (CS and WP). Initial and residual efficacy were determined in the laboratory. Knockdown data for the initial effects were processed by probit analysis and presented as knockdown time (KDT) parameters with kdt-p lines. Delayed effects were shown as knockdown efficacy (%) determined after 24 h of weevils’ contact with 7-, 14-, 30-, 60-, 90-, 120-, 150-, and 180-day-old deposits on each surface. Malathion (EC) and pirimiphos-methyl (EC) showed the highest initial knockdown efficacy on metal, while it was 3.6 (3.4)- and 4.4 (3.3)-fold lower on concrete and plywood, respectively. Lambda-cyhalothrin (CS and WP) showed the highest initial efficacy on concrete, and slightly lower (1.3 and 2.4) fold on metal and plywood, respectively. Both formulations of lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion on metal, as well as pirimiphos-methyl on plywood were 100 % efficient against S. oryzae 180 days after the treatment. Delayed efficacy of both formulations of lambda-cyhalothrin decreased on plywood after 120 days, and after 180 days the efficacy was 55 %. All insecticides, except lambda-cyhalothrin (CS), expressed low knockdown efficacy on concrete, while the deposit of lambda-cyhalothrin (CS) on concrete was 100 % efficient during 90 days, and after 120, 150, and 180 days the efficacy was 83, 65, and 17 %, respectively.

Keywords

Sitophilus oryzae Malathion Pirimiphos-methyl Lambda-cyhalotrhrin Different surfaces Initial and residual efficacy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dušan Jankov
    • 1
  • Dušanka Inđić
    • 1
  • Petar Kljajić
    • 2
  • Radmila Almaši
    • 1
  • Goran Andrić
    • 2
  • Slavica Vuković
    • 1
  • Mila Grahovac
    • 1
  1. 1.Department for Plant and Environmental ProtectionUniversity of Novi Sad, Faculty of AgricultureNovi SadSerbia
  2. 2.Laboratory of Applied EntomologyPesticide and Environment Research InstituteBelgradeSerbia

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