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The effect of an induced negative mood on the updating of affective information

Abstract

Updating is an important executive function that is vital for the attainment of goals such as cognitive tasks, daily activities, and the regulation of emotion. The ability to update affective content in working memory is said to be influenced by mood. However, little is known regarding the influences of mood on the valence of affective content. We hypothesized that first, a negative mood would impair the updating of affective information. Second, this impeding impact would be weaker for the updating of negative information due to the mood congruence effect. Sixty-three Russian-speaking participants were recruited for the experiment. Half of the participants were induced into a negative mood by negative pictures; the other half were presented with neutral pictures. All participants performed the affective 2-back task before and after mood induction. The results showed that negative mood impaired the accuracy rates of updating. However, the mood congruence effect was not observed in the updating of positive and negative materials. We recommend that more experiments be conducted with varied affective stimuli.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The IAPS codes of the negative pictures were 9301, 9322, 3213, 2352, 3101, 3150, 3130, 3051, 3060, 3069, 3261, and 3100; the neutral pictures were 7185, 2840, 7183, 7190, 1670, 7187, 2190, 2850, 7705, 5390, 7186, and 7025.

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Acknowledgements

The study was implemented in the framework of the Basic Research Program at the National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE) in 2021.

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Correspondence to Abdul-Raheem Mohammed.

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Handling editors: Katsumi Watanabe (Waseda University), Mario Dalmaso (Padova University); Reviews: Arianna Schiano (Denmark Technical University) and a second researcher who prefers to remain anonymous.

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Mohammed, AR., Lyusin, D. The effect of an induced negative mood on the updating of affective information. Cogn Process (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10339-021-01060-3

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Keywords

  • Negative mood
  • Affective updating
  • Mood congruence
  • Mood induction
  • n-back task