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Links between cognitive distortions and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in non-clinical young adulthood

Abstract

This study examined the possible link between cognitive distortions (CDs), which involve erroneous information processing in normal reasoning, and cognitive emotion regulation strategies (CERS), which are strategies implemented at the cognitive level to modulate the emotional response following a negative or unpleasant event, in a non-clinical young adult population. Ninety-six participants (age 18–39 years; 48 women) completed the French version of the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and the French Cognitive Distortions Inventory for adults. Overall, negative distortions were positively correlated with the use of non-adaptive strategies of cognitive emotion regulation, while positive distortions were negatively correlated with the use of adaptive strategies. The CDs most associated with the use of adaptive CERS were positive dichotomous reasoning, minimization and neutral omission in favour of the positive. Selective abstraction was the CD most associated with the use of non-adaptive CERS. We observed a negative correlation effect between education level and several distortions and catastrophizing, and a positive correlation with acceptance. Men used more positive maximization, requalification as negative, acceptance and blaming others than women. The discussion of the results focuses on explaining the observed relationships between the variables in this non-clinical sample.

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Correspondence to Romain Deperrois.

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Handling editor: Giulia Liberati (UC Louvain).

Reviewers: Rosemery Nelson-Gray (University of North Carolina at Greensboro) and a second researcher who prefers to remain anonymous.

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Deperrois, R., Combalbert, N. Links between cognitive distortions and cognitive emotion regulation strategies in non-clinical young adulthood. Cogn Process (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10339-021-01057-y

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Keywords

  • Cognitive emotion regulation
  • Cognitive distortions
  • Information processing
  • Young adulthood
  • Cognitive control