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Qing Dai, a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctitis

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Qing Dai (indigo naturalis), a traditional Chinese medicine, in the treatment for chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctitis.

Methods

Ten patients with chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctitis between January 2005 to January 2008 were treated with Qing Dai. Qing Dai was administered orally at a dose of 1.5 g, bid for 5 consecutive days, every 2 weeks for two courses. Patients were followed up every 3 months. The clinical response and side-effects were evaluated.

Results

Six patients showed improvement of rectal bleeding to grade 0–1 after 1 course of Qing Dai therapy. Four patients had reduced rectal bleeding to grade 0–1 after 2 courses of the therapy. The median follow-up time was 10 months (range: 6–24). During the follow-up period, 1 patient experienced recurrent rectal bleeding and was managed with topical formalin dabbing, which controlled the symptom. No treatment toxicity was observed.

Conclusion

Qing Dai may be a safe and effective treatment for chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctitis.

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Correspondence to Ximing Xu.

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Yuan, G., Ke, Q., Su, X. et al. Qing Dai, a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic hemorrhagic radiation proctitis. Chin. -Ger. J. Clin. Oncol. 8, 114 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10330-008-0141-9

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Key words

  • chronic radiation proctitis
  • rectal bleeding
  • treatment
  • Qing Dai