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Pollen grains infected with apple stem grooving virus serve as a vector for horizontal transmission of the virus

Abstract

Here, Nicotiana benthamiana plants became infected with apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) after pollination with pollen grains produced by ASGV-infected apple (Malus pumila) and N. benthamiana plants. Aniline blue staining and fluorescence microscopy revealed that pollen grains from the infected apple and N. benthamiana plants germinated, and their pollen tubes penetrated the stigmas of N. benthamiana, but the apple pollen tubes, unlike the N. benthamiana pollen tubes, stopped elongating in N. benthamiana styles. In a whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis, ASGV was detected in elongating pollen tubes from the ASGV-infected apple and N. benthamiana plants. However, when N. benthamiana stigmas were pollinated with ASGV-infected apple and N. benthamiana pollen grains that could not germinate, ASGV was not detected in any of the pollinated plants. Thus, penetration of the stigma and elongation in the style by pollen tubes harboring the virus results in horizontal pollen transmission of ASGV, and fertilization is not essential for the transmission.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI (no. 21K05590).

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Correspondence to Masamichi Isogai.

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Isogai, M., Shimoda, R., Nishimura, H. et al. Pollen grains infected with apple stem grooving virus serve as a vector for horizontal transmission of the virus. J Gen Plant Pathol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10327-021-01039-0

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Keywords

  • Apple stem grooving virus
  • Pollen transmission
  • Pollen-transmitted virus
  • Pollen-borne virus
  • Pollen grain
  • Pollen tube