Journal of General Plant Pathology

, Volume 79, Issue 1, pp 69–73 | Cite as

Infection-inhibition activity of avenacin saponins against the fungal pathogens Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, Bipolaris oryzae, and Magnaporthe oryzae

  • Yoshi-Shige Inagaki
  • Yoshiteru Noutoshi
  • Keiko Fujita
  • Atsuko Imaoka
  • Sakae Arase
  • Kazuhiro Toyoda
  • Tomonori Shiraishi
  • Yuki Ichinose
Others

Abstract

Triterpenoid saponins are sugar-modified triterpene derivatives. Cereals and other grasses are generally deficient in these secondary metabolites with the exception of oat. Oat accumulates antimicrobial triterpenoid saponins in its roots. These oat-root-derived compounds, called avenacins, confer broad-spectrum resistance to soil-borne pathogens. Here, we tested the effect of avenacins on the development of infection structures of fungal pathogens Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei and Bipolaris oryzae and Magnaporthe oryzae. We show that avenacins are able to inhibit the infection process of these phytopathogens on plant hosts.

Keywords

Avenacin saponin Infection-inhibiting activity Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei Bipolaris oryzae Magnaporthe oryzae 

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Copyright information

© The Phytopathological Society of Japan and Springer Japan 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoshi-Shige Inagaki
    • 1
  • Yoshiteru Noutoshi
    • 2
  • Keiko Fujita
    • 1
    • 4
  • Atsuko Imaoka
    • 3
  • Sakae Arase
    • 3
  • Kazuhiro Toyoda
    • 1
  • Tomonori Shiraishi
    • 1
  • Yuki Ichinose
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Pathology and Genetic Engineering Laboratory, Faculty of AgricultureOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan
  2. 2.Research Core for Interdisciplinary SciencesOkayama UniversityOkayamaJapan
  3. 3.Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Faculty of Life and Environmental ScienceShimane UniversityMatsueJapan
  4. 4.Faculty of Life and Environmental SciencesPrefectural University of HiroshimaShobaraJapan

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