Advertisement

Environmental Chemistry Letters

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 95–100 | Cite as

Evaluation of the levels and sources of trace elements in urban particulate matter

  • Slavica Rajšić
  • Zoran Mijić
  • Mirjana Tasić
  • Mirjana Radenković
  • Jasminka Joksić
Original Paper

Abstract

An assessment of air quality of Belgrade, Serbia, was performed by determining the trace element content in airborne daily PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected from a central urban area. The ambient concentrations of Zn were the highest in PM2.5 (1,998.0 ng m−3). Multivariate receptor modelling (principal component analysis and cluster analysis) has been applied to determine the contribution of different sources of specific metallic components in airborne particles. The obtained results showed that vehicle traffic and fossil fuel combustion in stationary objects were the main sources of trace metals in Belgrade urban aerosols.

Keywords

Trace elements PM10 PM2.5 Urban air Pollution sources Statistical analysis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by the Ministry of Science and Environmental Protection of the Republic of Serbia (No 141012). The authors gratefully acknowledge the Hydro-meteorological Institute of the Republic of Serbia and the Institute of Public Health of Belgrade, Serbia.

References

  1. Bem H, Gallorini M, Rizzio E, Krzeminska M (2003) Comparative studies on the concentrations of some elements in the urban air particulate matter in Lodz city of Poland and in Milan, Italy. Environ Int 29:423–428CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Dockery DW, Pope III CA (2006) Critical review: health effects of fine particulate air pollution: lines that connect. J Air Waste Manage Assoc 56:709–742CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hueglin C, Gehrig R, Baltensperger U, Gysel M, Monn C, Vonmont H (2005) Chemical characterization of PM2.5, PM10 and coarse particles at urban, near-city and rural sites in Switzerland. Atmos Environ 39:637–651CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kaiser HF (1960) The application of electronic computers to factor analysis. Educ Psychol Meas 20:141–151CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Kyotani T, Iwatsuki M (2002) Characterization of soluble and insoluble components in PM 2.5 and PM10 fractions of airborne particulate matter in Kofy city, Japan. Atmos Environ 36:639–649CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Li N, Sioutas C, Cho A, Schmitz D, Misra C, Sempf J, Froines JR, Nel A (2003) Ultrafine particulate pollutants induse oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Environ Health Perspect 111:455–460CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Manalis N, Grivas G, Protonotarios V, Moutsatsou A, Samara C, Chaloulakou A (2005) Toxic metal content of particulate matter (PM10), within the greater area of Athens. Chemosphere 60:557–566CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mason B (1966) Principles of geochemistry. Wiley. New YorkGoogle Scholar
  9. Nowak B (1998) Contents and relationship of elements in human hair for a non-industrialized population in Poland. Sci Total Environ 209:59–68CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Pacyna JM, Pacyna EG (2001) An assessment of global and regional emissions of trace metals to the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources worldwide. Environ Rev 9:269–298CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Puxbaum H, Gomiscek B, Kalina M, Bauer H, Salam A, Stopper S, Preining O, Hauck H (2004) A dual site study of PM2.5 and PM10 aerosol chemistry in the larger region of Vienna, Austria. Atmos Environ 38:3949–3958CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Rajšić FS, Tasić DM, Novaković TV, Tomašević NM (2004) First assessment of the PM10 and PM2.5 particulate level in the ambient air of Begrade city. Environ Sci Pollut Res 11:158–164CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Samara C, Kouimtzis Th, Tsitouridou R, Kanias G, Simeonov V (2003) Chemical mass balance source apportionment of PM10 in an industrialized urban area of northern Greece. Atmos Environ 37:41–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Tomašević M, Rajšić S, Đorđević D, Tasić M, Krstić J, Novaković V (2005) Heavy metals accumulation in tree leaves from urban areas. Environ Chem Lett 61:753–760Google Scholar
  15. Wang X, Sato S, Xing B, Tamamura S, Tao S (2005) Source identification, size distribution and indicator screening of airborne trace metals in Kanayawa, Japan. J Aerosol Sci 36:197–210CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slavica Rajšić
    • 1
  • Zoran Mijić
    • 1
  • Mirjana Tasić
    • 1
  • Mirjana Radenković
    • 2
  • Jasminka Joksić
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of PhysicsBelgradeSerbia
  2. 2.Institute for Nuclear Science VincaBelgradeSerbia

Personalised recommendations