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Preventive effects of green vegetable juice cocktail on benzene-induced hematological and immunological disorders

Effets préventifs d’un cocktail de jus de légumes verts contre les troubles hématologique et immunologique induits par le benzène

Phytothérapie

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Abstract

This study aimed to assess the effects of green vegetable cocktail juice (GVCJ) made of carrot, beetroot, celery, and radish on benzene-induced hematologic and immunologic disorders in rats. Forty rats were divided into group 1 (controls), group 2 (C6H6), group 3 (GVCJ-C6H6), and group 4 (C6H6-GVCJ). The weight factor, blood formula, serum protein electrophoresis, and histopathology were evaluated. The results showed, in group 2, a nonsignificant statistically difference in body weight, a significant decrease of red blood cells and hemoglobin rate, a moderate increase in the lymphocytes, and a strong immune response, whereas in groups 3 and 4, hematological parameters have been restored. Histological examination showed, in group 2, cell damage in the splenic tissue with an expansion of the white pulp but the spleen necrosis and cell injuries were not observed in groups 3 and 4.

Résumé

L’objectif de cette étude est d’évaluer les effets d’un cocktail de jus de légumes composé de betterave rouge, carotte, céleri et radis (BCCR) sur les désordres hématologique et immunologique chez des rats exposés au benzène. Quarante rats répartis en: groupe 1 (témoins), groupe 2 (exposés au C6H6), groupe 3 (BCCR–C6H6) et groupe 4 (C6H6–BCCR). Le poids corporel, la formule sanguine, l’électrophorèse des protéines sériques et l’histopathologie ont été évalués. Les résultats ont montré une différence non significative du gain du poids corporel, une significative diminution des globules rouges et du taux d’hémoglobine ainsi qu’une légère élévation des lymphocytes et une forte réponse immunitaire alors que, dans les groupes 3 et 4, les paramètres hématologiques ont été préservés. L’examen histologique a montré, dans le groupe 2, des lésions cellulaires au niveau de la rate avec une expansion de la pulpe blanche alors qu’aucune lésion tissulaire ou cellulaire n’a été observée dans les groupes 3 et 4.

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Correspondence to A. Berroukche.

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Berroukche, A., Boufadi, Y.M., Soltani, F. et al. Preventive effects of green vegetable juice cocktail on benzene-induced hematological and immunological disorders. Phytothérapie (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10298-016-1054-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10298-016-1054-3

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