Review of World Economics

, Volume 141, Issue 3, pp 375–403 | Cite as

Do Foreign Investors Care about Labor Market Regulations?

Article

Abstract

This study investigates whether labor market flexibility affects foreign direct investment (FDI) flows across 19 Western and Eastern European countries. The analysis uses firm level data on new investments undertaken in the period 1998–2001. The study employs a variety of proxies for labor market regulations reflecting the flexibility of individual and collective dismissals, the length of the notice period and the required severance payment along with controls for business climate characteristics. The results suggest that greater flexibility in the host country’s labor market in absolute terms or relative to that in the investor’s home country is associated with larger FDI inflows.

Keywords

Foreign direct investment labor market regulation firm level data 

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Copyright information

© Kiel Institute for World Economics 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.World BankWashingtonUSA

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