Mycoscience

, Volume 53, Issue 1, pp 45–48 | Cite as

Primary simple assays of cellulose-degrading fungi

  • Tsuneo Watanabe
  • Manabu Kanno
  • Masahiro Tagawa
  • Hideyuki Tamaki
  • Yoichi Kamagata
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  • 145 Downloads

Abstract

Some 25 fungi, including at least 14 basidiomycetes, one ascomycete, and five anamorphic fungi were evaluated for their cellulose-degrading abilities in Difco potato dextrose broth or Difco malt extract broth cultures with cellulosic substrates (e.g., filter paper) in plastic Petri dishes. Among them, Peniophora sp. 06-13 and Phlebia sp. 99-335 reduced the dry weights of the whole cultures with these substrates more than the dry weights of the respective original substrates after 30 days of culture, showing definite cellulose degradation. In the cultures with more than 10 test fungi including Pycnoporus coccineus 84-117, such weight losses did not occur. This assay technique for the primary screening for cellulose degrading fungi is simple, inexpensive, reproducible and accurate.

Keywords

Absorbent cotton Cellulose powder Filter paper Peniophora sp. Phlebia sp. 

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Copyright information

© The Mycological Society of Japan and Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsuneo Watanabe
    • 1
  • Manabu Kanno
    • 1
  • Masahiro Tagawa
    • 1
  • Hideyuki Tamaki
    • 1
  • Yoichi Kamagata
    • 1
  1. 1.Bioproduction Research InstituteNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)TsukubaJapan

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