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Journal of Plant Research

, Volume 131, Issue 4, pp 671–680 | Cite as

Leaf area and photosynthesis of newly emerged trifoliolate leaves are regulated by mature leaves in soybean

  • Yushan Wu
  • Wanzhuo Gong
  • Yangmei Wang
  • Taiwen Yong
  • Feng Yang
  • Weigui Liu
  • Xiaoling Wu
  • Junbo Du
  • Kai Shu
  • Jiang Liu
  • Chunyan Liu
  • Wenyu Yang
Regular Paper

Abstract

Leaf anatomy and the stomatal development of developing leaves of plants have been shown to be regulated by the same light environment as that of mature leaves, but no report has yet been written on whether such a long-distance signal from mature leaves regulates the total leaf area of newly emerged leaves. To explore this question, we created an investigation in which we collected data on the leaf area, leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf anatomy, cell size, cell number, gas exchange and soluble sugar content of leaves from three soybean varieties grown under full sunlight (NS), shaded mature leaves (MS) or whole plants grown in shade (WS). Our results show that MS or WS cause a marked decline both in leaf area and LMA in newly developing leaves. Leaf anatomy also showed characteristics of shade leaves with decreased leaf thickness, palisade tissue thickness, sponge tissue thickness, cell size and cell numbers. In addition, in the MS and WS treatments, newly developed leaves exhibited lower net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs) and transpiration rate (E), but higher carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentration in the intercellular space (Ci) than plants grown in full sunlight. Moreover, soluble sugar content was significantly decreased in newly developed leaves in MS and WS treatments. These results clearly indicate that (1) leaf area, leaf anatomical structure, and photosynthetic function of newly developing leaves are regulated by a systemic irradiance signal from mature leaves; (2) decreased cell size and cell number are the major cause of smaller and thinner leaves in shade; and (3) sugars could possibly act as candidate signal substances to regulate leaf area systemically.

Keywords

Leaf area Leaf anatomy Photosynthesis Shade Systemic signal 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank teachers in our team for fruitful discussions and suggestions, and thank Tayan Liang for improving the quality of English of this manuscript, we would also like to thank those who helped improve this manuscript. This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (nos. 31571615 and 31701371).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10265_2018_1027_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (102 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 102 KB)

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Copyright information

© The Botanical Society of Japan and Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yushan Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Wanzhuo Gong
    • 4
  • Yangmei Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Taiwen Yong
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Feng Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Weigui Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiaoling Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Junbo Du
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kai Shu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jiang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Chunyan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Wenyu Yang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.College of AgronomySichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Crop Ecophysiology and Farming System in SouthwestMinistry of AgricultureChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Sichuan Engineering Research Center for Crop Strip Intercropping SystemChengduPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Characteristic Crops Research InstituteChongqing Academy of Agricultural SciencesChongqingPeople’s Republic of China

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