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Diel changes in the CO2 exchange rates of reproductive organs of the tropical tree Durio zibethinus

Abstract

The daily variations in the in situ CO2 exchange of the reproductive organs of Durio zibethinus trees, growing in an experimental field at University Putra Malaysia (UPM), were examined at different growth stages. Reproductive organs emerged on the leafless portions of branches inside the crown. The photon flux densities (PFD) in the chambers used for the measurements were less than 100 μmol m−2  s−1 and were 40% of the PFD outside of the crown. The daytime net respiration rate and the nighttime dark respiration rate were higher at the time of flower initiation and during the mixed stages, when flower buds, flowers, and fruit coexist, than at the flower bud stage. The net respiration rate was lower than the daytime dark respiration rate at given temperatures, especially at the flower bud and fruit stages. Conversely, the net respiration rate was similar to the daytime dark respiration rate at the mixed stage. Photosynthetic CO2 refixation reduced the daily respiratory loss by 17, 5, 0.3, and 24% at the flower bud, flower initiation, mixed, and fruit stages, respectively.

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Acknowledgements

We wish to thank Professor A. Hagihara, University of the Ryukyus, for his helpful advice, Mr. J. Shamsuddin, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), for generously supporting our research, and the staff of the experimental field station at UPM for access to their facilities. This work is a part of the Malaysia–Japan joint research project between Forest Research Institute of Malaysia (FRIM), UPM and National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Japan. This work was supported by a Global Environmental Research Program Grant (No. E-4) from the Environmental Agency, Japan.

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Correspondence to Kazuharu Ogawa.

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Ogawa, K., Abdullah, A.M., Awang, M. et al. Diel changes in the CO2 exchange rates of reproductive organs of the tropical tree Durio zibethinus. J Plant Res 118, 187–192 (2005). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10265-005-0207-5

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Keywords

  • Dark respiration
  • Flower
  • Flower bud
  • Fruit
  • Net respiration
  • Photosynthetic CO2 refixation