Deformation-induced hydrolysis of a degradable polymeric cylindrical annulus

Abstract

A thermodynamically consistent framework for describing the response of materials undergoing deformation-induced degradation is developed and applied to a particular biodegradable polymer system. In the current case, energy is dissipated through the mechanism of hydrolytic degradation and its effects are incorporated in the constitutive model by appropriately stipulating the forms for the rate of dissipation and for the degradation-dependent Helmholtz potential which changes with the extent of the degradation of the material. When degradation does not occur, the response of the material follows the response of a power-law generalized neo-Hookean material that fits the response of the non-degraded poly(l-lactic acid) under uniaxial extension. We study the inflation and extension of a degrading cylindrical annulus and the influence of the deformation on the mechanism of degradation and its consequent mechanical response. Depreciation of mechanical properties due to degradation confers time-dependent characteristics to the response of the biodegradable material: the material creeps when subjected to constant loads and stresses necessary to keep a fixed deformation relax.

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Correspondence to James E. Moore Jr..

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Soares, J.S., Rajagopal, K.R. & Moore, J.E. Deformation-induced hydrolysis of a degradable polymeric cylindrical annulus. Biomech Model Mechanobiol 9, 177–186 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10237-009-0168-z

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Keywords

  • Degradation
  • Scission
  • Strain-softening
  • Damage
  • Internal variable
  • Poly(lactic acid)