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Condition factor dependency of burst swimming ability between wild and hatchery-reared chum salmon fry (Oncorhynchus keta)

Abstract

Burst swimming velocity (Uburst) was compared between wild and hatchery-reared chum salmon fry. In the hatchery-reared fry, Uburst was significantly correlated with the condition factor, but not with the body mass and fork length. In the wild-reared fry, on the other hand, Uburst ranged widely and did not correlate with condition factor. These suggest that well-balanced growth under satisfactory nutrient condition at the early developmental stage improves Uburst, and in the wild-reared fry, their cautiousness and various experiences may override the condition factor dependency of Uburst.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Shin-Otsuchi fishery guide for providing chum salmon fry. We thank Dr. Takaaki Abe for technical supports and Dr. Marty KS Wong for valuable comments. We thank Prof. Christopher A. Loretz of State University of New York at Buffalo for critical reading of the manuscript. This study was financially supported by Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Science (TEAMS) research program of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Exploratory Research from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) to S. N. (25660153). We declare that all experiments in this study, including fish collection, handling and processing, were approved by the Animal Experiment Committee of the University of Tokyo and performed in accordance with the Manual for Animal Experiments prepared by the committee and the current Japanese laws.

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Correspondence to Shigenori Nobata.

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Nobata, S., Houki, S., Kitagawa, T. et al. Condition factor dependency of burst swimming ability between wild and hatchery-reared chum salmon fry (Oncorhynchus keta). Ichthyol Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10228-021-00838-x

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Keywords

  • Burst swimming
  • Chum salmon
  • Condition factor
  • Hatchery fry
  • Wild fry