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Difficulty in sex identification of two local populations of red-spotted masu salmon using two salmonid male-specific molecular markers

Abstract

The present study investigated the validity of two male-specific molecular markers, OtY2 and sdY, in two wild populations of red-spotted masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou ishikawae). All phenotypic males were positive for both markers in both populations. On the other hand, some phenotypic females were also positive in each population: 32% and 11% in OtY2 and 71% and 67% in sdY. Individuals with no male-specific amplification would be identified as female, suggesting the applicability of these markers (especially, OtY2) when selecting females for life-history studies, strategic conservation, and effective breeding programs.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Kensuke Mori for editing and improving the manuscript. We thank Shin Ukaji and staffs of Wakayama Forest Research Station for their substantial assistance for our sample collection in the Arida River system. We appreciated Daisuke Kishi for his excellent sample collection in the Nagara River system. We also appreciate Keiko Kosuge for her technical support in our molecular analysis. This work was partially supported by Young-Researcher-Promotion Grant of Nihonseimei-zaidan (2017-08).

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Correspondence to Rui Ueda.

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Ueda, R., Takeshima, H. & Sato, T. Difficulty in sex identification of two local populations of red-spotted masu salmon using two salmonid male-specific molecular markers. Ichthyol Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10228-021-00837-y

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Keywords

  • Molecular sex identification
  • OtY2
  • sdY
  • Red-spotted masu salmon