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Examining the behavioral features of Chinese teachers and students in the learner-centered instruction

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to reveal whether and how learner-centered instruction in comparison with traditional teacher-centered instruction might present unique effects on the learning behaviors and academic motivation of Chinese students. Meanwhile, it was also explored how the distinctive instructing features of Chinese teachers assuming the learner-centered approaches in comparison with those teachers in the traditional classroom, might impact on the associations between learner-centered instruction and learning behaviors of Chinese students. Measures assessing the perceived instruction behaviors of teachers and students’ learning behaviors and academic motivation were administered to 394 high-school students in the experimental group and 368 high-school students in the control group. The results indicated that the implementation of learner-centered instruction brought certain changes on the instruction behaviors of Chinese teachers, which might have certain beneficial influences on students’ learning behaviors inside the classroom but failed to better support students to be autonomous and self-directed learners.

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Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Special Project for Teaching and Scientific Research Development of Social Science Teachers in Zhejiang University.

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Correspondence to Hong-Yu Cheng.

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Hong-Yu Cheng. Zhejiang University, School of Education 707 Tian Jia Bin Building, 148 Tian Mu San Lu, Xi Xi Campus, Hangzhou, China, 310028, Email: chy688198@zju.edu.cn

Current themes of research:

The research of the author in these years has been focused on the investigation of the cross-cultural differences in learning behavior, cognitive style, and learning style between Chinese students and Western students. He also investigated how various teaching approaches might affect Chinese students’ learning behaviors and how to assume appropriate teaching designs to induce effective learning behaviors of students. A few relevant articles have been published in professional journals.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Cheng, H., & Zhang, S. (2017). Examining the relationship between holistic/analytic style and classroom learning behaviors of high school students. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 32(2).

Cheng, H., & Guan, S. (2012). The role of learning approaches in explaining the distinct learning behaviors presented by American and Chinese undergraduates in the classroom. Learning and Individual Differences, 22(3), 414-418.

Cheng, H., Andrade, H.L., & Yan, Z. (2011). A cross-cultural study of learning behaviors in the classroom: From a thinking style perspective. Educational Psychology, 31(7), 825–841. https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410.2011.608526.

Qian-Ting Ding. Zhejiang University, School of Education, 703 Tian Jia Bin Building, 148 Tian Mu San Lu, Xi Xi Campus, Hangzhou, China, 310028, Email: 21803009@zju.edu.cn

Current themes of research:

The research of Dr. Ding is largely focus on the learning styles presented by Children in classroom environments, and the development of lying. She use experimental methods to investigate how children come to grips with the concept and moral implication of lying, whether children are gullible or they are able to detect others’ lies, and whether children can tell convincing lies in various social situations.

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Cheng, HY., Ding, QT. Examining the behavioral features of Chinese teachers and students in the learner-centered instruction. Eur J Psychol Educ 36, 169–186 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10212-020-00469-2

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Keywords

  • Learner-centered instruction
  • Learning behavior
  • Academic motivation
  • Chinese student