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Decreasing students’ stress through time management training: an intervention study

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and 4 weeks after training. We used a “non-equivalent dependent variable design” (Cook and Campbell, Quasi-experimentation: design and analysis for field settings, p. 118, 1979) with perceived stress and perceived control of time as dependent variables, which should be influenced by the training, and demands as control variable, which should not be changed. As expected, perceived stress decreased and perceived control of time increased after training, whereas demands did not change. Therefore, time management training might be beneficial for undergraduate students’ well-being. Nevertheless, more intervention studies in this field are necessary, especially with lager samples, to contribute to more robust results and conclusions.

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Correspondence to Alexander Häfner.

Additional information

Alexander Häfner Adolf-Würth-Center for the History of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, D-97070 Würzburg, Germany. E-mail: alexander.haefner@wuerth-industrie.com

Current themes of research:

Effectiveness of time management training programs, procrastination, and stress prevention.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Häfner, A., Stock, A., Pinneker, L., & Ströhle, S. (2014). Stress prevention through a time management training intervention: an experimental study. Educational Psychology, 34, 403–416.

Häfner, A., Oberst, V., & Stock, A. (2014). Avoiding procrastination through time management: an experimental intervention study. Educational Studies, 40, 352–360.

Verena Oberst Adolf-Würth-Center for the History of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, D-97070 Würzburg, Germany

Current themes of research:

Effectiveness of time management training programs. Different fields in sports psychology.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Häfner, A., Oberst, V., & Stock, A. (2014). Avoiding procrastination through time management: an experimental intervention study. Educational Studies, 40, 352–360.

Armin Stock Adolf-Würth-Center for the History of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, D-97070 Würzburg, Germany

Current themes of research:

History of psychology. Different fields in organizational psychology. Cognitive psychology.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Häfner, A., Stock, A., Pinneker, L., & Ströhle, S. (2014). Stress prevention through a time management training intervention: an experimental study. Educational Psychology, 34, 403–416.

Häfner, A., Oberst, V., & Stock, A. (2014). Avoiding procrastination through time management: an experimental intervention study. Educational Studies, 40, 352–360.

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Häfner, A., Stock, A. & Oberst, V. Decreasing students’ stress through time management training: an intervention study. Eur J Psychol Educ 30, 81–94 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10212-014-0229-2

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Keywords

  • Time management
  • Training
  • Stress
  • Student well-being