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First year effects of induction arrangements on beginning teachers’ psychological processes

Abstract

This study examined the (1) effects of a supportive program (i.e., induction arrangement) on beginning teachers’ (BTs’) psychological processes after a period of 1 year and (2) psychological paths of influence of the arrangement. Participants (56 Dutch secondary schools with 143 BTs) were randomly allocated to two conditions. Experimental schools provided a carefully developed and implemented induction arrangement to their BTs. Control schools followed their regular (induction) arrangements. BTs perceived stress causes, self-efficacy, and job strain were measured with a pre-test post-test design. Condition effects were examined by means of independent sample t tests. The perception of the provided support was measured, and its psychological path of influence was investigated by conducting standard multiple regression analyses. BTs in the experimental condition indicated that they (1) received more support, (2) experienced fewer stress causes (i.e., lack of learning opportunities and lack of regulating possibilities), and (3) experienced more self-efficacy in the classroom at the end of the school year. Furthermore, fewer BTs left the experimental schools after 1 year. Reducing BTs’ workload and supporting their professional development are the most influential induction arrangement elements provided in this study. Providing carefully developed and implemented induction arrangements may soften the harshness of the context in which BTs operate, by decreasing their perceived stress causes and increasing their level of self-efficacy in the classroom. This, in turn, could positively affect BTs’ decision to stay in the teaching profession and might, therefore, add to a solution to the teacher shortage problem.

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Acknowledgments

This study was funded by The Dutch Ministry of Education (onderwijsbewijs project).

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Correspondence to Michelle Helms-Lorenz.

Additional information

Michelle Helms-Lorenz. University of Groningen, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Landleven 1, 9747 AD Groningen, the Netherlands. E-mail: m.helms-lorenz@rug.nl; Web site: http://www.rug.nl/lerarenopleiding/onderzoek/teachingTeacherEducation/inductie?lang=nl, http://www.rug.nl/lerarenopleiding/onderzoek/opleidenindeschool/index

Current themes of research:

Effects of induction arrangements.

Effects of different teacher preparation routes.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Helms-Lorenz, M., Slof, B. & Vermue, C.E. (2012). Beginning teachers’ self-efficacy and stress and the supposed effects of induction arrangements. Educational Studies, 38 (2), 189–207.

Canrinus, E. T., Helms-Lorenz, M., Beijaard, D., Buitink, J., & Hofman, W. H. A. (2011). Profiling teachers’ sense of their professional identity. Educational Studies, 37, 593–608.

Canrinus, E. T., Helms-Lorenz, M., Beijaard, D., Buitink, J., & Hofman, W. H. A. (2012). Self-efficacy, job satisfaction, motivation and commitment: exploring the relationships between indicators of teachers’ professional identity. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 27, 115–132.

Bert Slof. University of Groningen, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Landleven 1, 9747 AD Groningen, the Netherlands. E-mail: b.slof@rug.nl

Current themes of research:

Effects of induction arrangements.

Effects of different teacher preparation routes.

Most relevant publications in the field of Psychology of Education:

Helms-Lorenz, M., Slof, B. & Vermue, C.E. (2012). Beginning teachers’ self-efficacy and stress and the supposed effects of induction arrangements. Educational Studies, 38 (2), 189–207.

Slof, B., Erkens, G., Kirschner, P. A., & Jaspers, J. G. M. (2010). Design and effects of representational scripting on group performance. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58, 589–608.

Slof, B., Erkens, G., Kirschner, P. A., Jaspers, J. G. M., & Janssen, J. (2010). Guiding learners’ online complex learning-task behavior through representational scripting. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 927–939.

Wim van de Grift. University of Groningen, Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences, Landleven 1, 9747 AD Groningen, the Netherlands. E-mail: w.j.c.m.van.de.grift@rug.nl

Current themes of research:

The professional development of the teacher.

Most relevant publication:

Van de Grift, W. (2007). Quality of teaching in four European countries: a review of the literature and an application of an assessment instrument. Educational Research, 49(2), 127–152.

Houtveen, A.A.M. & W.J.C.M. van de Grift (2007). Effects of metacognitive strategy instruction and instruction time on reading comprehension. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 18(2), 173–190.

Van de Grift, W.J.C.M. (2009). Reliability and validity in measuring the value added of schools. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 20(2), 269–285.

Van de Grift, W., Van der Wal, M., & Torenbeek, M. (2011). Ontwikkeling in de pedagogisch didactische vaardigheid van leraren in het basisonderwijs [The development of effective teaching behavior of teachers in primary education]. Pedagogische Studiën, (88), 416–432.

Appendices

Appendix 1

Table 7 Guidelines to optimize working conditions, ensuring instructive work and reducing work pressure

Appendix 2

Table 8 Measures to support the development of the beginning teacher

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Helms-Lorenz, M., Slof, B. & van de Grift, W. First year effects of induction arrangements on beginning teachers’ psychological processes. Eur J Psychol Educ 28, 1265–1287 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10212-012-0165-y

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Keywords

  • Teacher attrition/retention
  • Beginning teachers
  • Induction programs
  • Self-efficacy
  • Stress