Modern Rheumatology

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 370–375 | Cite as

Early aggressive intervention with tocilizumab for rheumatoid arthritis increases remission rate defined using a Boolean approach in clinical practice

  • Toshihisa Kojima
  • Atsushi Kaneko
  • Yuji Hirano
  • Hisato Ishikawa
  • Hiroyuki Miyake
  • Hideki Takagi
  • Yuichiro Yabe
  • Takefumi Kato
  • Kenya Terabe
  • Naoki Fukaya
  • Hiroki Tsuchiya
  • Tomone Shioura
  • Koji Funahashi
  • Masatoshi Hayashi
  • Daizo Kato
  • Hiroyuki Matsubara
  • Naoki Ishiguro
Original Article

Abstract

The goal of treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should be remission, for which a new definition was proposed in 2011. To determine which patients can achieve the new Boolean-based definition of remission in clinical practice, we analyzed factors associated with remission in 123 patients who received tocilizumab for 52 weeks. We found that patients with short disease duration (<4.8 years) had a significantly higher rate of remission (31.7%) than those with longer disease duration, and patient global assessment was the most important factor for achieving remission. Multivariate analysis revealed the following predictors of remission: short disease duration [<4.8 years; odds ratio (OR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–4.7] and lower disease activity [28-joint disease activity score–erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) <5.23; OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.2–5.1). In this study, we showed that remission, as newly defined using a Boolean approach, is a realistic goal for patients treated with tocilizumab with short disease duration in real-world clinical practice.

Keywords

Rheumatoid arthritis Remission Tocilizumab Patient-reported outcome Interleukin 6 

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Copyright information

© Japan College of Rheumatology 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshihisa Kojima
    • 1
  • Atsushi Kaneko
    • 2
  • Yuji Hirano
    • 3
  • Hisato Ishikawa
    • 4
  • Hiroyuki Miyake
    • 5
  • Hideki Takagi
    • 6
  • Yuichiro Yabe
    • 7
  • Takefumi Kato
    • 8
  • Kenya Terabe
    • 9
  • Naoki Fukaya
    • 10
  • Hiroki Tsuchiya
    • 6
  • Tomone Shioura
    • 11
  • Koji Funahashi
    • 1
  • Masatoshi Hayashi
    • 1
  • Daizo Kato
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Matsubara
    • 1
  • Naoki Ishiguro
    • 1
    • 12
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Nagoya University HospitalNagoya University, School of MedicineNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryNagoya Medical CenterNagoyaJapan
  3. 3.Department of RheumatologyToyohashi Municipal HospitalToyohashiJapan
  4. 4.Department of RheumatologyNagano Red Cross HospitalNaganoJapan
  5. 5.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryIchinomiya Municipal HospitalIchinomiyaJapan
  6. 6.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryNagoya Kyoritsu HospitalNagoyaJapan
  7. 7.Department of RheumatologyTokyo Kosei Nenkin HospitalTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Kato Orthopedic ClinicOkazakiJapan
  9. 9.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryFukuroi Municipal HospitalFukuroiJapan
  10. 10.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryKariya-Toyota General HospitalKariyaJapan
  11. 11.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryShizuoka Kosei HospitalShizuokaJapan
  12. 12.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty and Graduate School of MedicineNagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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