Leuconostoc bacteremia in a patient with amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis and tuberculosis arthritis

Abstract

Leuconostoc infections are rare and usually occur in immunocompromised patients. This report describes a case of Leuconostoc lactis bacteremia in a patient with coexisting rheumatoid arthritis and tuberculosis arthritis. A disrupted gastrointestinal barrier due to gastrointestinal amyloidosis in long-standing rheumatoid arthritis and tuberculosis arthritis could be a risk factor for Leuconostoc bacteremia. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, the patient progressed to septic shock and multi-organ failure. The fatal course might have been caused by rapid progression of gastrointestinal pathology, which could be a risk factor for Leuconostoc bacteremia.

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Correspondence to Minyoung Her.

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Shin, J., Her, M., Moon, C. et al. Leuconostoc bacteremia in a patient with amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis and tuberculosis arthritis. Mod Rheumatol 21, 691–695 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10165-011-0465-0

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Keywords

  • Leuconostoc lactis
  • Amyloidosis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Tuberculosis