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Encounter with heavier females changes courtship and fighting efforts of male field crickets Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

Abstract

The effects of mating experience on male mating behavior are mediated by four factors: mating cost, such as resource depletion, perception of mating opportunities, self-perception of attractiveness, and female quality. For example, encountering females might increase male expectations of prospective mating opportunities, while copulation increases self-perception of attractiveness in males. To determine the relative importance of these factors, the effect of mating on the two components of reproductive effort (courtship and fighting effort) in Gryllus bimaculatus was examined. Calling activity before and after encountering females was measured, and copulation success was recorded. Subsequently, the intensity and outcome of male–male fighting behavior was recorded. Female encounter increased calling activity irrespective of copulation, thereby indicating that the perception of mating opportunities is important factor for the males. Changes in courtship effort of males were larger and fighting success was lower when they were previously paired with relatively heavier females. These results indicate that male reproductive effort is also affected by quality of previous mating partners.

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Data availability statement

The data used for this study are available from the corresponding author on request.

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Acknowledgements

I wish to thank Dr. Gadi V. P. Reddy (Montana State University) for helpful comments on earlier drafts, and Dr. G. Sakurai (National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences) for helping with the statistical analyses. I am also extremely grateful to Dr. Kevin A Judge for proofreading the revised manuscript. I would like to thank Editage (www.editage.com) for English language editing. The manuscript has been significantly improved based on the comments of the six anonymous reviewers.

Funding

This study was supported in part by the Special Budget of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT; Establishment of Research and Education Network on Biodiversity and Its Conservation in the Satsunan Islands) and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI Grant Nos. 16K21244 and 19K06842.

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Correspondence to Takashi Kuriwada.

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The author has no competing interests.

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All experimental procedures in this study were conducted in accordance with the guidelines for the use of animals in research at Kagoshima University.

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Kuriwada, T. Encounter with heavier females changes courtship and fighting efforts of male field crickets Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae). J Ethol 40, 145–151 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10164-021-00742-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10164-021-00742-x

Keywords

  • Acoustic communication
  • Sexual selection
  • Orthoptera
  • Courtship behavior
  • Calling song
  • Field cricket