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Optimization of process parameters using response surface methodology for maximum liquid yield during thermal pyrolysis of blend of virgin and waste high-density polyethylene

Abstract

The pyrolytic fuel generated by high-density polyethylene (HDPE) has the potential to replace fossil fuels as a primary source of energy. Thermal pyrolysis of HDPE had been performed in a stainless-steel batch reactor having a height of 300 mm, inner diameter 200 mm, and maximum liquid yield was found as 69.33% for an optimum temperature of 500 ℃ in presence of nitrogen as carrier gas. The pyrolytic liquid was composed of mostly alkanes and alkenes and has a high calorific value of 41.5 MJ/kg. The waste plastics of HDPE were blended with virgin plastics to compare the liquid product yield and optimize the process condition. The optimal pyrolysis condition had been determined by response surface methodology (RSM) in combination with central composite design (CCD). The regression equation and analysis of variance were found using Design–Expert Software and F value (82.59) and p value (< 0.0001) for optimized model indicates that the model is fitted extremely well. Both thermal pyrolysis of virgin and waste plastics produce significant amounts of liquid. The huge plastic waste accumulated at various landfill sites can be effectively reduced by the application of this process.

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Data availability

The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the IIEST Shibpur and NIT Sikkim for the support provided for the work. The support and assistance provided by Mr. Suman Pathak, TA, Chemistry Laboratory, is highly acknowledged. The authors are also thankful to all the researchers referred in the reference section for providing various relevant information for this research.

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Correspondence to Neelanjan Dutta.

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Dutta, N., Mondal, P. & Gupta, A. Optimization of process parameters using response surface methodology for maximum liquid yield during thermal pyrolysis of blend of virgin and waste high-density polyethylene. J Mater Cycles Waste Manag 24, 1182–1193 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10163-022-01392-y

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Keywords

  • HDPE
  • Waste HDPE
  • Thermal pyrolysis
  • Optimization
  • Design–expert
  • Quality of liquid fuel