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Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 1228–1238 | Cite as

Eco-efficient recycling of drinking water treatment sludge and glass waste: development of ceramic bricks

  • Olga Kizinievič
  • Viktor Kizinievič
  • Renata Boris
  • Giedrius Girskas
  • Jurgita Malaiškienė
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Current management for drinking water treatment sludge and glass waste is insufficient, and a new method is needed. We sought to develop a new approach for effective management. This work analyses the application possibilities of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) and windows glass waste (GW) to be used for the production of ceramic products. DWTS and GW are renewable, ecological and economical waste additives which save raw materials. Ceramic body with (40–60) of DWTS and (10–40) of GW additives have been burnt at 900 and 1000 °C temperatures. It is determined that DWTS and GW have an impact on physical–mechanical properties of ceramic body (density, compressive strength, water absorption, porosity) and change macro- and microstructure. DWTS additive also acts as natural colouring pigment. The work proposes eco-efficient application way of drinking water treatment sludge and windows glass waste, it solves exportation of DWTS and GW to landfills problems and positively affects regional ecological balance.

Keywords

Cleaner materials Drinking water treatment sludge Fe2O3 Glass waste Recycling Clay brick 

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Copyright information

© Springer Japan KK, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olga Kizinievič
    • 1
  • Viktor Kizinievič
    • 1
  • Renata Boris
    • 1
  • Giedrius Girskas
    • 1
  • Jurgita Malaiškienė
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Building MaterialsVilnius Gediminas Technical UniversityVilniusLithuania

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