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Nationwide surveillance of bacterial pathogens from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis conducted by the Japanese surveillance committee during 2009 and 2010: antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus

Abstract

The Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of uropathogens responsible for female acute uncomplicated cystitis at 43 hospitals throughout Japan from April 2009 to November 2010. In this study, the causative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus) and their susceptibility to various antimicrobial agents were investigated by isolation and culturing of bacteria from urine samples. In total, 387 strains were isolated from 461 patients, including E. coli (n = 301, 77.8 %), S. saprophyticus (n = 20, 5.2 %), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 13, 3.4 %), and Enterococcus faecalis (n = 11, 2.8 %). S. saprophyticus was significantly more common in premenopausal women (P = 0.00095). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of 19 antibacterial agents used for these strains were determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute manual. At least 87 % of E. coli isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, and 100 % of S. saprophyticus isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. The proportions of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli strains were 13.3 % and 4.7 %, respectively. It is important to confirm the susceptibility of causative bacteria for optimal antimicrobial therapy, and empiric antimicrobial agents should be selected by considering patient characteristics and other factors. However, the number of isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant or ESBL-producing strains in gram-negative bacilli may be increasing in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in Japan. Therefore, these data present important information for the proper treatment of UTIs and will serve as a useful reference for future surveillance studies.

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Conflict of interest

Akira Watanabe is a consultant to Daiichi-Sankyo, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Toyama Chemical, and Otsuka Pharmaceutical. A.W. has received a speaker’s honorarium from MSD Japan, Glaxo SmithKline K.K., Shionogi & Co. Ltd., Daiichi-Sankyo, Taisho Toyama Pharmaceutical, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, and Pfizer Japan Inc.; and grant support from Kyorin Pharmaceutical, Shionogi & Co. Ltd., Taisho Pharmaceutical, Toyama Chemical, Daiichi-Sankyo, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma, Taiho Pharma, and Meiji Seika Pharma. Keisuke Sunakawa has research grant for other research than this study from Meiji Seika Pharma Co., Ltd.

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Correspondence to Hiroshi Hayami.

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Hayami, H., Takahashi, S., Ishikawa, K. et al. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial pathogens from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis conducted by the Japanese surveillance committee during 2009 and 2010: antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus . J Infect Chemother 19, 393–403 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-013-0606-9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-013-0606-9

Keywords

  • Surveillance
  • Susceptibility
  • Resistance
  • Acute uncomplicated cystitis