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Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 891–897 | Cite as

Usefulness of presepsin in the diagnosis of sepsis in a multicenter prospective study

  • Shigeatsu EndoEmail author
  • Yasushi Suzuki
  • Gaku Takahashi
  • Tatsuyori Shozushima
  • Hiroyasu Ishikura
  • Akira Murai
  • Takeshi Nishida
  • Yuhei Irie
  • Masanao Miura
  • Hironobu Iguchi
  • Yasuo Fukui
  • Kimiaki Tanaka
  • Tsuyoshi Nojima
  • Yoshikazu Okamura
Original Article

Abstract

The clinical usefulness of presepsin for discriminating between bacterial and nonbacterial infections (including systemic inflammatory response syndrome) was studied and compared with procalcitonin (PCT) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a multicenter prospective study. Suspected sepsis patients (n = 207) were enrolled into the study. Presepsin levels in patients with systemic bacterial infection and localized bacterial infection were significantly higher than in those with nonbacterial infections. In addition, presepsin, PCT, and IL-6 levels in patients with bacterial infectious disease were significantly higher than in those with nonbacterial infectious disease (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0001, respectively). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.908 for presepsin, 0.905 for PCT, and 0.825 for IL-6 in patients with bacterial infectious disease and those with nonbacterial infectious disease. The cutoff value of presepsin for discrimination of bacterial and nonbacterial infectious diseases was determined to be 600 pg/ml, of which the clinical sensitivity and specificity were 87.8 % and 81.4 %, respectively. Presepsin levels did not differ significantly between patients with gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial infections. The sensitivity of blood culture was 35.4 %; that for presepsin was 91.9 %. Also there were no significant differences in presepsin levels between the blood culture-positive and -negative groups. Consequently, presepsin is useful for the diagnosis of sepsis, and it is superior to conventional markers and blood culture.

Keywords

Presepsin Soluble CD14-subtype Procalcitonin Sepsis Infection 

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeatsu Endo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yasushi Suzuki
    • 1
  • Gaku Takahashi
    • 1
  • Tatsuyori Shozushima
    • 1
  • Hiroyasu Ishikura
    • 2
  • Akira Murai
    • 2
  • Takeshi Nishida
    • 2
  • Yuhei Irie
    • 2
  • Masanao Miura
    • 3
  • Hironobu Iguchi
    • 3
  • Yasuo Fukui
    • 4
  • Kimiaki Tanaka
    • 4
  • Tsuyoshi Nojima
    • 4
  • Yoshikazu Okamura
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Critical Care Medicine, School of MedicineIwate Medical UniversityMoriokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Faculty of MedicineFukuoka UniversityFukuokaJapan
  3. 3.Anesthesiology, Emergency and Critical Care CenterKariya Toyota General HospitalKariyaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Gastroenterological SurgeryKochi Health Sciences CenterKochiJapan
  5. 5.Research and Development Division, Yachiyo R&D DepartmentMitsubishi Chemical Medience CorporationTokyoJapan

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