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Pseudomonas putida bacteremia in adult patients: five case reports and a review of the literature

Abstract

Pseudomonas putida belongs to the fluorescent group of Pseudomonas species, a group of opportunistic pathogens that primarily cause nosocomial infections. However, few cases of P. putida bacteremia in adult patients have been reported. We report five cases of P. putida bacteremia in adult patients and review 23 previously reported cases. Our five patients consisted of three cases of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), one case of indwelling biliary drainage tube-related cholangitis, and one case of cholecystitis. Many of the 23 previously reported cases also included CRBSI. Of the clinical backgrounds, in all 28 reported cases including ours, 24 (85.7%) were immunocompromised. Of the clinical management, in CRBSI, devices were removed in almost all cases (92.9%). Antibiotic susceptibility data of our five cases and another previous case showed that patients with bacteremia had a high susceptibility of P. putida to anti-pseudomonal β-lactams. The prognosis for bacteremia with P. putida was good, as 26 (92.9%) of the total 28 cases were cured.

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Correspondence to Takatoshi Kitazawa.

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Yoshino, Y., Kitazawa, T., Kamimura, M. et al. Pseudomonas putida bacteremia in adult patients: five case reports and a review of the literature. J Infect Chemother 17, 278–282 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-010-0114-0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-010-0114-0

Keywords

  • Pseudomonas putida
  • Bacteremia
  • Antimicrobial susceptibility