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A patient with primary human immunodeficiency virus infection for whom highly active antiretroviral therapy was successful

Abstract

 We report the case of a 25-year-old male Japanese homosexual with primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection and early stage syphilis. Approximately 60 days after HIV exposure by sex with another man, the patient abruptly had high fever, after which he experienced a variety of severe, prolonged symptoms such as painful oral mucosa ulcerations, rash, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and a 5.5-kg weight loss. Serum lactate dehydrogenase and liver biochemical test values were elevated. Antibodies to HIV by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot (WB) test were negative at the time of symptom onset, but serum HIV-1 RNA level was 1 585 000 copies/ml. Antibody seroconversions were found on day 9 after the onset of symptoms by ELISA and on day 16 by WB test, suggesting primary HIV infection. Within 2 weeks of starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), all symptoms except lymphadenopathy were resolved, and the serum HIV-1 RNA level dramatically decreased to 5011 copies/ml, eventually becoming undetectable by the standard method. The patient has remained asymptomatic for the 18 months since symptom resolution after HAART, and HIV-1 RNA remains undetectable.

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Received: January 15, 2002 / Accepted: July 24, 2002

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Furusyo, N., Ariyama, I., Chong, Y. et al. A patient with primary human immunodeficiency virus infection for whom highly active antiretroviral therapy was successful. J Infect Chemother 8, 361–364 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0198-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0198-2

  • Key words Human immunodeficiency virus-1
  • Primary HIV infection
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Syphilis