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Development and use of palivizumab (Synagis): a passive immunoprophylactic agent for RSV

Abstract

Palivizumab (Synagis; Abbott Laboratories), a humanized, monoclonal antibody, prevents lower respiratory tract infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). RSV causes significant morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide and is particularly severe in pre-term infants, children with cardiopulmonary disease, and the immunosuppressed population. The first such genetically engineered agent to be used effectively against a human infectious disease, palivizumab significantly reduces the number of hospitalizations caused by RSV in high-risk infants. This article reviews the preclinical development and clinical experience of palivizumab.

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Correspondence to G. M. Barbarotto.

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Pollack, P., Groothuis, J.R. & Barbarotto, G.M. Development and use of palivizumab (Synagis): a passive immunoprophylactic agent for RSV. J Infect Chemother 8, 201–206 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0178-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0178-6

Key words

  • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)
  • Bronchiolitis
  • Chronic lung disease (CLD)
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)
  • Prematurity
  • Humanized monoclonal antibody
  • Palivizumab (Synagis)
  • IMpact-RSV study