Skip to main content

Staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome in an adult due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Abstract

We report a case of a 71-year-old man with staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS). The patient, with a chronic history of diabetes mellitus, was admitted to our hospital with lumbago, and a diagnosis of renal-cell carcinoma with bone metastasis was made. In hospital he had sudden onset of high fever and erythema, followed by the formation of flaccid bullae and exfoliation, with a positive Nikolsky sign. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), producing exfoliative toxin B, was isolated from blood and bile cultures, and Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from bile culture. Skin biopsy specimen showed a cleavage of the epidermis at the level of the granular layer. The patient was diagnosed as having SSSS and cholecystitis, and was treated with intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage, which led to recovery. SSSS in adults is usually associated with immunosuppression. A. hydrophila is recognized as an opportunistic pathogen. SSSS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of immunocompromised adult patients with sudden onset of high fever and erythema.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Additional information

Received: November 5, 2001 / Accepted: March 30, 2002

Acknowledgments We thank Dr. Toyoji Okubo, Laboratory of Drug Resistance in Bacteria, Gunma University School of Medicine, for phage typing of the isolated S. aureus.

About this article

Cite this article

Ito, Y., Funabashi Yoh, M., Toda, K. et al. Staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome in an adult due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus . J Infect Chemother 8, 256–261 (2002). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0175-9

Download citation

  • Published:

  • Issue Date:

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10156-002-0175-9

  • Key words Staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome Adult Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Aeromonas hydrophila Opportunistic infection