International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 361–367 | Cite as

Significance of prostate-specific antigen kinetics after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with androgen deprivation therapy in patients with localized prostate cancer

  • Wataru Fukuokaya
  • Sangji Kim
  • Takao Natsuyama
  • Kanako Matsuzaki
  • Homare Shiomi
  • Hiroki Kitoh
  • Nobuko Utsumi
  • Hiromasa Kurosaki
  • Masafumi Inoue
  • Koichiro Akakura
Original Article
  • 60 Downloads

Abstract

Background

To evaluate the relationship between biochemical recurrence and post-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by radiotherapy with various durations of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT).

Methods

We reviewed our single-institution, retrospectively maintained data of 144 patients with T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer who underwent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) between December 2005 and December 2015 and 113 patients were fulfilled the inclusion criteria. In this cohort, 3D-CRT was delivered with a dose in the range from 70.0 to 72.0 Gy with ADT. All patients received ADT as concurrent regimens. Biochemical recurrence was defined on the basis of the following: “PSA nadir + 2.0 ng/ml or the clinical judgement of attending physicians”. Kaplan–Meier, log-rank, and Cox regression analyses were carried out.

Results

The median follow-up period was 54.0 months. The median duration of ADT was 17 months (interquartile range, 10–24 months). There was a trend toward statistical significant correlation between post-radiation PSA decline rate of ≥ 90% and PSA recurrence (p = 0.056). The same correlation could be observed in D’Amico high-risk patients (p = 0.036). However, it was not observed between PSA nadir and PSA recurrence (p = 0.40) in univariate analysis. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that post-radiation PSA decline rate of ≥ 90% was a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients who received radiotherapy with various durations of ADT (p = 0.044).

Conclusions

Post-radiation PSA decline rate of ≥ 90% was a prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence in localized prostate cancer patients received 3D-CRT with various durations of ADT.

Keywords

Androgen deprivation therapy Biochemical recurrence Prostate cancer Prostate-specific antigen Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

No author has any conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wataru Fukuokaya
    • 1
  • Sangji Kim
    • 1
  • Takao Natsuyama
    • 1
  • Kanako Matsuzaki
    • 1
  • Homare Shiomi
    • 1
  • Hiroki Kitoh
    • 1
  • Nobuko Utsumi
    • 2
  • Hiromasa Kurosaki
    • 2
  • Masafumi Inoue
    • 3
  • Koichiro Akakura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyJapan Community Health Care Organization Tokyo Shinjuku Medical CenterTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Radiation TherapyCommunity Health Care Organization Tokyo Shinjuku Medical Center TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of PathologyJapan Community Health Care Organization Tokyo Shinjuku Medical CenterTokyoJapan

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