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International Journal of Clinical Oncology

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 142–150 | Cite as

Low preoperative serum cholesterol level is associated with aggressive pathologic features and poor cancer-specific survival in patients with surgically treated renal cell carcinoma

  • Ho Won Kang
  • Sung Pil Seo
  • Won Tae Kim
  • Seok Joong Yun
  • Sang-Cheol Lee
  • Wun-Jae Kim
  • Eu Chang Hwang
  • Seok Ho Kang
  • Sung-Hoo Hong
  • Jinsoo Chung
  • Tae Gyun Kwon
  • Hyeon Hoe Kim
  • Cheol Kwak
  • Seok-Soo Byun
  • Yong-June Kim
  • The KORCC (KOrean Renal Cell Carcinoma) group
Original Article

Abstract

Background

The prognostic implications of preoperative serum total cholesterol (TC) level in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remain poorly understood. We investigated the prognostic role of preoperative serum TC in patients with surgically treated RCC from a large, multi-institutional Korean collaboration.

Patients and methods

A database of 3064 patients with RCC who underwent radical or partial nephrectomy between 1999 and 2011 at eight academic centers was analyzed. Preoperative serum TC levels were measured in fasting blood samples.

Results

Low preoperative serum TC level was associated with aggressive tumor characteristics, including large tumor size, advanced stage, high nuclear grade, lymph node involvement, and sarcomatous differentiation (all P < 0.001). Low TC level was associated with poor recurrence-free or cancer-specific survival (CSS) in the entire cohort, whereas the significance of the association changed after stratification by disease stage and histologic subtype. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that preoperative TC, as a continuous or categorical variable, was an independent predictor of CSS.

Conclusions

Preoperative low serum TC level was associated with aggressive tumor characteristics and poor CSS in patients with surgically treated RCC. Preoperative TC may provide additional guidance regarding the choice of therapeutic strategies to improve prognosis.

Keywords

Renal cell carcinoma Nephrectomy Cholesterol Prognosis Survival 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (2015R1D1A1A01057786).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Japan Society of Clinical Oncology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ho Won Kang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sung Pil Seo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Won Tae Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Seok Joong Yun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sang-Cheol Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wun-Jae Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eu Chang Hwang
    • 3
  • Seok Ho Kang
    • 4
  • Sung-Hoo Hong
    • 5
  • Jinsoo Chung
    • 6
  • Tae Gyun Kwon
    • 7
  • Hyeon Hoe Kim
    • 8
  • Cheol Kwak
    • 8
  • Seok-Soo Byun
    • 9
  • Yong-June Kim
    • 1
    • 2
  • The KORCC (KOrean Renal Cell Carcinoma) group
  1. 1.Department of UrologyChungbuk National University College of MedicineCheongjuSouth Korea
  2. 2.Department of UrologyChungbuk National University HospitalCheongjuSouth Korea
  3. 3.Department of UrologyChonnam National University Hwasun HospitalGwangjuSouth Korea
  4. 4.Department of UrologyKorea University School of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  5. 5.Department of Urology, College of MedicineThe Catholic University of KoreaSeoulSouth Korea
  6. 6.Department of UrologyNational Cancer CenterGoyangSouth Korea
  7. 7.Department of UrologyKyungpook National University College of MedicineDaeguSouth Korea
  8. 8.Department of UrologySeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulSouth Korea
  9. 9.Department of UrologySeoul National University Bundang HospitalSeongnamSouth Korea

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